njgeoweb



Layers Listed Alphabetically

Available Profiles

GeoWeb Profile
Ambient Water Monitoring Profile
Barnegat Bay Profile
Bear Profile
BES - Bureau of Energy and Sustainability Profile
Geology Profile
Historic Preservation Profile
Safe Drinking Water Profile
SRP - Remedial Priority Scoring Profile
Tidelands Profile
Water Allocation Profile
Well Driller Profile



GeoWeb Profile:

Environmental Monitoring
Air Monitoring Stations
Ambient Biomonitoring Network (AMNET)
EPA - STORET Water Quality Monitoring
Fish Index Of Biotic Integrity
New Jersey - WQDE Water Quality Monitoring
Shellfish Classification
USGS NWIS Water Monitoring
Volunteer Water Monitoring Stations

TMDL Data
TMDL (Streamsheds)
TMDL (Streamsheds) Pre-2008
TMDL (Lakesheds)
TMDL (Shellfish)

Sites and Facilities
Auto Body Shops
Child Care Centers
Chromate Sites
Deed Notice Areas
Dry Cleaners
Gas Stations
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Historic Fill
Known Contaminated Sites List
Laboratories OQA Certified
NJEMS Sites
NJPDES Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO)
NJPDES Discharge Points-Surface Water
NJPDES Regulated Facility Locations
Schools
Underground Storage Tanks Facilities

Planning Areas
Areas in Need of Redevelopment
Brownfield Development Area (Outline)
Brownfield Development Area (Block and Lots)
CAFRA
Critical Environmental and Historic Sites
D & R Canal Commission Review Zones
Highlands
Open Space (State)
Open Space (County)
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area
Sewer Service Areas
State Plan Centers
State Planning Areas
Urban Enterprise Zones

Landscape/Natural Heritage
Landscape Project - Freshwater Mussel Habitat
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Atlantic Coastal
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Delaware Bay
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Marine
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Piedmont Plains
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Pinelands
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Skylands
Landscape Project - Vernal Habitat
Landscape Regions
Natural Heritage Grid Map
Natural Heritage Priority Sites

Historic Areas
Archaeological Site Grid
Historic Districts
Historic Properties

Water
Category One Waters
Purveyor
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Surface Water Quality Classification
Water Bodies
Water Source Areas
Watershed Management Areas
Watersheds (HUC11)
Well Head Protection Areas (Community)
Well Head Protection Areas (Non-Community)

Land
Impervious Surface % (2012)
Land Use 2007
Land Use 2012
Land Use Change 2007-2012
NJ State Park Service Trails
Soils (SSURGO)
Upper Wetlands Boundary
Wetlands (2012)

Base Layers
Congressional Districts
Counties
Legislative Districts
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Place Names
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
Well Program Grid
ZIP Codes

Geology
Abandoned Mines
Bedrock Aquifers
Bedrock Geology
Bedrock Outcrop
Bedrock - Surface Topography
Canals and Water Raceways
Dikes
Drought Regions
Earthquake Epicenters
Faults
Folds
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Landslides
Physiographic Provinces
Quarter Quad Grid
Quarries
Sole-Source Aquifers
Surficial Aquifers
Surficial Geology

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1977 Tidelands Basemaps
1970 NJDEP Wetlands Basemaps
1930 Black and White
Historical Maps
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
Topographic Images (24k)
Topographic Images (100k)
USDA: 2013 Natural
USDA: 2010 Natural
USDA: 2006 Natural

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Ambient Water Monitoring Profile:


Sites and Facilities
Deed Notice Areas
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites
NJPDES Discharge Points-Surface Water
NJPDES Regulated Facility Locations
NJPDES Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO)
Underground Storage Tanks Facilities

Water Monitoring
Ambient Biomonitoring Network (AMNET)
Barnegat Bay Water Quality Monitoring Sites
EPA STORET Water Quality Monitoring
Fish Index Of Biotic Integrity
NJ WQDE Water Quality Monitoring
Shellfish Classification
USGS NWIS Water Monitoring
Volunteer Water Monitoring Stations

Planning Areas
Barnegat Bay Boundary
CAFRA
Highlands
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area
Sewer Service Areas

Water
Category One Waters
Head of Tide
Purveyor
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Surface Water Quality Classification
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas
Watersheds (HUC11)

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
ZIP Codes

Land
Bedrock Aquifers
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Impervious Surface % (2012)
Land Use 2007
Land Use 2012
Land Use Change 2007-2012
Soils (SSURGO)
Surficial Aquifers
Wetlands (2012)

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Historical Maps
USDA: 2013 Natural
USDA: 2010 Natural
USDA: 2006 Natural


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Barnegat Bay Profile:


Sites and Facilities
Barnegat Bay Funded Stormwater Projects
Deed Notice Areas
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites
NJPDES Discharge Points-Surface Water
NJPDES Non-point Source Regulated Facilities
NJPDES Regulated Facilities
Underground Storage Tanks Facilities

Water Monitoring
Ambient Biomonitoring Network (AMNET)
Barnegat Bay Water Quality Monitoring Sites
EPA STORET Water Quality Monitoring
Fish Index Of Biotic Integrity
NJ WQDE Water Quality Monitoring
USGS NWIS Water Monitoring
Volunteer Water Monitoring Stations

Planning Areas
Barnegat Bay Boundary
CAFRA
Open Space Barnegat Bay (County,Municipal and Nonprofit)
Open Space Barnegat Bay (State)
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area

Water
Category One Waters
Purveyor
Shellfish Classification
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Surface Water Quality Classification
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas
Watersheds (HUC11)

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
ZIP Codes

Land
Bedrock Aquifers
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Impervious Surface % (2012)
Land Use 2007
Land Use 2012
Land Use Change 2007-2012
Soils (SSURGO)
Surficial Aquifers
Wetlands (2012)

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Historical Maps
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural
USDA: 2010 Natural
USDA: 2006 Natural


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Bear Profile:


Wildlife/Landscape/Natural Heritage
Bear Incidents 2010-2012
Landscape Project - Freshwater Mussel Habitat
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Atlantic Coastal
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Delaware Bay
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Marine
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Piedmont Plains
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Pinelands
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Skylands
Landscape Project - Vernal Habitat
Landscape Regions
Natural Heritage Grid Map
Natural Heritage Priority Sites

Sites and Facilities
Abandoned Mines
Child Care Centers
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites
Schools

Historic Areas
Historic Properties
Historic Districts
Historic Archaeological Site Grid

Water
Category One Waters
Purveyor
Streams
Water Bodies
Water Source Areas

Land
Land Use 2007
Land Use 2012
Land Use Change 2007-2012
Wetlands (2012)

Base Layers
Counties
Congressional Districts
Elevation Contours
Legislative Districts
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
ZIP Codes

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural


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Bureau of Energy and Sustainability (BES) Profile:


Solar Resources
Average Annual Solar PV Resource
Electric Utilities Territory Map
Federal Sites with Large-Scale Solar PV Potential
Landfills over 35 acres (108)
Landfill Parcel Groups over 35 acres (211)
Solar Siting Analysis

Wind Resources
Areas of Interest Blocks
Areas of Interest NM Lines
Avoidance Zones
Caution Point Feature
Ecological Baseline Study Area
Electric Utilities Territory Map
Federal State Boundary
MMS Lease Blocks Interpolated
National Waterway Network
Navigation Area Feature
NJ Call Area
Sport Ocean Fishing Grounds
Tug Barge Transit Route
Utility Line Feature
Wind Energy Zone (Paulsboro)

Biomass Resources
Crop Residues
Federal Sites with Biomass Potential
Forest Residues
Methane Emissions from Domestic Waste Water
Methane Emissions from Landfills
Methane Emissions from Manure Management
Primary Mill Residues
Secondary Mill Residues
Urban Wood Waste

Sites and Facilities
Deed Notice Areas
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Hydropower Generation Facilities
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites
NJPDES Discharge Points-Surface Water
NJPDES Regulated Facilities

Planning Areas
Areas in Need of Redevelopment
CAFRA (polygon)
CAFRA Coastal Centers
CAFRA Coastal Planning Areas
D & R Canal Commission Review Zones
Highlands
Innovation Zones
Metropolitan Transportation Planning Areas
New Jersey Redevelopment Authority Eligible Municipalities (NJRA)
Open Space (State)
Open Space (County)
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area
Sewer Service Areas
Sustainable Jersey Certified Municipalities
Transit Village Centers
Transit Village Buffer
Upper Wetlands Boundary
Urban Enterprise Zones

Transportation
Airports
Public Alternative Vehicle Fueling Stations
Private Alternative Vehicle Fueling Stations
Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
Major Roads
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
Railroad Stations (Passenger)
Railroads Passenger

Base Layers
Child Care Centers
Coastline
Colleges & Universities
Counties
Elevation Contours
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Place Names
Schools
ZIP Codes

Land
Farmland Preservation Program
Impervious Surface % (2012)
Land Use 2007
Land Use 2012
Shellfish Classification
Soils (SSURGO)
Tidelands
Wetlands (2012)

Landscape Layers
Archaeological Site Grid
Historic Properties
Historic Districts
Landscape Project - Freshwater Mussel
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Atlantic Coastal
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Delaware Bay
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Marine
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Piedmont Plains
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Pinelands
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Skylands
Landscape Project - Vernal Habitat
Landscape Regions

Water
Category One Waters
Purveyor
Streams Network 2002(NHD)
Surface Water Quality Classification
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas

Geology
Abandoned Mines
Canals and Water Raceways
Faults
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Historic Fill
Quarries
Quarter Quad Grid

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Historical Maps
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural


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Geology Profile:


Abandoned Mines
Earthquake Epicenters
Landslides
Physiographic Provinces
Quarries
Tidal Benchmark Network

Ambient Ground Water Data
Ambient - Major Ions
Ambient - Metals
Ambient - Nutrients
Ambient - Pesticides
Ambient - Radionuclides
Ambient - VOC

Geophysical Data
Gravity Anomalies (1 mgal)
Magnetic Anomalies (gammas)

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Place Names
Quad Grid
Quarter Quad Grid
Roads NJ (Centerlines)

Water
Canals and Water Raceways
Drought Regions
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas
Watersheds (HUC11)
Well Head Protection Areas (Community)
Well Head Protection Areas (Non-Community)

Aquifers
Bedrock Aquifers
Sole-Source Aquifers
Surficial Aquifers

Surficial Geology
Bedrock - Surface Topography
Soils (SSURGO)
Surficial Geology
Surficial Geology Cross-sections

Bedrock Geology
Bedrock Geology
Bedrock Geology Cross-sections
Bedrock Outcrop
Dikes
Faults
Folds

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
Topographic Images (24k)
Topographic Images (100k)
USDA: 2013 Natural

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Historic Preservation Profile:


Cultural Resources GIS Inventory
Historic Properties
Historic Districts

Archaeological GIS Data
Canals and Water Raceways
Archaeological Site Grid
Historic Fill
Soils (SSURGO)

Planning Areas
Areas in Need of Redevelopment
CAFRA
Critical Environmental and Historic Sites
D & R Canal Commission Review Zones
Highlands
Open Space (State)
Open Space (County)
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area
State Plan Centers
State Planning Areas

Water
Category One Waters
Head of Tide
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Watersheds by Name (HUC11)
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas

Land
Upper Wetlands Boundary
Wetlands (2012)

Geology
Abandoned Mines
Bedrock - Surface Topography
Bedrock Outcrop
Bedrock Geology
Physiographic Provinces
Quarries
Surficial Geology

Base Layers
Counties
Congressional Districts
Legislative Districts
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Place Names
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Quarter Quad Grid
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
Tidelands Grid
Well Program Grid
ZIP Codes

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Historical Maps
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural
USDA: 2010 Natural
USDA: 2006 Natural


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Safe Drinking Water Profile:


Water
Groundwater Treatment Facility Source Water Areas
Purveyor Service Area (Drinking Water)
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Surface-water Source Water Areas
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas
Watersheds by Name (HUC11)
Well Head Protection Areas (Community)
Well Head Protection Areas (Non-Community)

Geology
Bedrock Geology
Surficial Geology

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Roads NJ (Centerlines)

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
USDA: 2013 Natural


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SRP- Remedial Priority Scoring Profile:


Sites and Facilities
Auto Body Shops
Brownfield Development Area (Block and Lots)
Brownfield Development Area (Outline)
Child Care Centers
Chromate Sites
Deed Notice Areas
Dry Cleaners
Gas Stations
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Historic Fill
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites
Schools
SRP - Preferred ID
Underground Storage Tanks Facilities

Water
Category One Waters
Purveyor
Streams Network 2002(NHD)
Surface-water Source Water Areas
Surface Water Quality Classification
Water Bodies
Well Head Protection Areas (Community)
Well Head Protection Areas (Non-Community)

Land
Land Use 2012
Soils (SSURGO)
Upper Wetlands Boundary
Wetlands (2012)

RPS - Ecological Layers
Highlands
Landscape Project - Freshwater Mussel
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Atlantic Coastal
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Delaware Bay
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Marine
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Piedmont Plains
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Pinelands
Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Skylands
Landscape Project - Vernal Habitat
Landscape Regions
Natural Heritage Grid Map
Natural Heritage Priority Sites
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
Well Program Grid
ZIP Codes

Geology
Abandoned Mines
Bedrock Aquifers
Bedrock Geology
Bedrock Outcrop
Bedrock - Surface Topography
Dikes
Faults
Folds
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Quarter Quad Grid
Quarries
Sole-Source Aquifers
Surficial Aquifers
Surficial Geology

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural

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Tidelands Profile:


CAFRA
Head of Tide
NJEMS Sites
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Tidelands
Tidelands Grid

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
ZIP Codes

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1977 Tidelands Basemaps
1970 NJDEP Wetlands Basemaps
1930 Black and White
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural


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Water Allocation Profile:


Water
Category One Waters
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Water Bodies
Watersheds (HUC11)
Watershed Management Areas

Sites and Facilities
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites
NJPDES Discharge Points-Surface Water
NJPDES Regulated Facilities

Planning Areas
Highlands
Pinelands Boundary
Pinelands Management Area

Land
Elevation Contours
Wetlands (2012)

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Parcels Data (Block and Lot)
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
Well Program Grid
ZIP Codes

Geology
Bedrock Aquifers
Bedrock Geology
Drought Regions
Groundwater Recharge Areas
Physiographic Provinces
Surficial Aquifers
Surficial Geology

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
Topographic Images (Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural

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Well Driller Profile:


Potential Groundwater Pollution Concerns
Deed Notice Areas
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA)
Groundwater Contamination Areas (CKE)
Known Contaminated Sites List
NJEMS Sites

Wells and Well Head Protection Areas
Well Head Protection Areas (Community)
Well Head Protection Areas (Non-Community)

Planning Areas
Highlands
Pinelands Boundary

Water
Purveyor
Streams
Sub-Watersheds (HUC14)
Water Bodies
Watershed Management Areas
Watersheds (HUC11)

Base Layers
Counties
Major Roads
Mid-Atlantic States
Municipalities
Parcels
Place Names
Roads NJ (Centerlines)
Well Program Grid
Well Program Grid 2 X 2 M
ZIP Codes

Imagery
2012 Natural
2012 Infrared
2007 Natural
2007 Infrared
2002 Infrared
1995 Infrared
1930 Black and White
Topographic Images(Color 24k)
USDA: 2013 Natural


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Data Descriptions


Abandoned Mines: contains locations and attributes for abandoned mines. The nine types of abandoned mines are Copper, Graphite, Iron, Lead, Mica, Manganese, Sulfide, Uranium and Zinc. Abandoned mine locations in the database are mapped at a scale of 1:24,000. metadata

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Air Monitoring Stations: Ambient Air Quality Monitors are strategically located stations throughout the state of New Jersey and collect and analyze certain air pollutant data. The ambient pollutant data is collected and analyzed to verify that the pollutants are in compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The public is notified in those cases where pollutants exceed accepted levels according to the quality standards. metadata

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Airports: This data is for internal NJDEP use only. Do not distribute externally. The Public Use Airports database is a geographic point database of aircraft landing facilities in the United States and U.S. Territories. Attribute data is provided on the physical and operational characteristics of the landing facility, current usage including enplanements and aircraft operations, congestion levels and usage categories. There are 19755 airport landing facilities in this dataset. This geospatial data is derived from the FAA's National Airspace System Resource Aeronautical Data Product (Effective 21 February 2002).Airports for NJ were reselected out for NJ DEP use. metadata

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Alternative Vehicle Fueling Stations: The data contained within this layer represents all of the public and private fueling stations for alternative fueled vehicles in the State, downloaded from the US Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Data Center (http://www.afdc.energy.gov/). The fueling stations shown include Biodiesel, Compressed Natural Gas, Ethanol, Electric, and Propane. In addition to showing the location of these stations, users can view details on each of the stations, including hours of operation and forms of payment accepted. metadata

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Ambient - Major Ions: Ground-water quality data from the Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network was and is being collected to increase our understanding of quality versus the geologic makeup of various aquifers and quality versus non-point source impacts from land use. This data set was established to allow all interested parties easy access the network data in a visual format. The network is being set up over a 5-year period which started in fiscal year 1999. Each year, network wells are installed, and a small percent selected from existing wells, and sampled. Well water samples for this layer were analyzed for Field parameters (like Water Temperature, Specific Conductance, and others) and Major ions (like Sodium, Potassium, and others).

A negative number (ex. -2) implies less than (ex. <2) reporting limit; The reporting limit is 2 times the detection limit. Some of the detection limits for a particular constituent varied with the method accuracy. -99999 implies an estimated value; usually means the constituent was detected below the reporting limit and the confidence in the concentration determination is not acceptable for standard reporting. A zero (0) imples no sampling performed for that parameter. metadata

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Ambient - Metals: Ground-water quality data from the Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network was and is being collected to increase our understanding of quality versus the geologic makeup of various aquifers and quality versus non-point source impacts from land use. This data set was established to allow all interested parties easy access the network data in a visual format. The network is being set up over a 5-year period which started in fiscal year 1999. Each year, network wells are installed, and a small percent selected from existing wells, and sampled. Well water samples for this layer were analyzed for Metals (like arsenic, Mercury, Chromium, and others).

A negative number (ex. -2) implies less than (ex. <2) reporting limit; The reporting limit is 2 times the detection limit. Some of the detection limits for a particular constituent varied with the method accuracy. -99999 implies an estimated value; usually means the constituent was detected below the reporting limit and the confidence in the concentration determination is not acceptable for standard reporting. A zero (0) imples no sampling performed for that parameter. metadata

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Ambient - Nutrients: Ground-water quality data from the Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network was and is being collected to increase our understanding of quality versus the geologic makeup of various aquifers and quality versus non-point source impacts from land use. This data set was established to allow all interested parties easy access the network data in a visual format. The network is being set up over a 5-year period which started in fiscal year 1999. Each year, network wells are installed, and a small percent selected from existing wells, and sampled. Well water samples for this layer were analyzed for Nutrients (like Nitrogen Ammonia, Nitorgen Nitrite, Phosphorus, and others).

A negative number (ex. -2) implies less than (ex. <2) reporting limit; The reporting limit is 2 times the detection limit. Some of the detection limits for a particular constituent varied with the method accuracy. -99999 implies an estimated value; usually means the constituent was detected below the reporting limit and the confidence in the concentration determination is not acceptable for standard reporting. A zero (0) imples no sampling performed for that parameter. metadata

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Ambient - Pesticides: Ground-water quality data from the Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network was and is being collected to increase our understanding of quality versus the geologic makeup of various aquifers and quality versus non-point source impacts from land use. This data set was established to allow all interested parties easy access the network data in a visual format. The network is being set up over a 5-year period which started in fiscal year 1999. Each year, network wells are installed, and a small percent selected from existing wells, and sampled. Well water samples for this layer were analyzed for Pesticides (like Propachlor, Diazinon, Atrazine, and others).

A negative number (ex. -2) implies less than (ex. <2) reporting limit; The reporting limit is 2 times the detection limit. Some of the detection limits for a particular constituent varied with the method accuracy. -99999 implies an estimated value; usually means the constituent was detected below the reporting limit and the confidence in the concentration determination is not acceptable for standard reporting. A zero (0) imples no sampling performed for that parameter. metadata

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Ambient - Radionuclides: Ground-water quality data from the Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network was and is being collected to increase our understanding of quality versus the geologic makeup of various aquifers and quality versus non-point source impacts from land use. This data set was established to allow all interested parties easy access the network data in a visual format. The network is being set up over a 5-year period which started in fiscal year 1999. Each year, network wells are installed, and a small percent selected from existing wells, and sampled. Well water samples for this layer were analyzed for Radionuclides (like Gross Beta, Radium, Alpha, and others).

A negative number (ex. -2) implies less than (ex. <2) reporting limit; The reporting limit is 2 times the detection limit. Some of the detection limits for a particular constituent varied with the method accuracy. -99999 implies an estimated value; usually means the constituent was detected below the reporting limit and the confidence in the concentration determination is not acceptable for standard reporting. A zero (0) imples no sampling performed for that parameter. metadata

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Ambient - VOC: Ground-water quality data from the Ambient Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network was and is being collected to increase our understanding of quality versus the geologic makeup of various aquifers and quality versus non-point source impacts from land use. This data set was established to allow all interested parties easy access the network data in a visual format. The network is being set up over a 5-year period which started in fiscal year 1999. Each year, network wells are installed, and a small percent selected from existing wells, and sampled. Well water samples for this layer were analyzed for Volatile Organic Compounds (like Chloroform, Benzene, Acetone, and others).

A negative number (ex. -2) implies less than (ex. <2) reporting limit; The reporting limit is 2 times the detection limit. Some of the detection limits for a particular constituent varied with the method accuracy. -99999 implies an estimated value; usually means the constituent was detected below the reporting limit and the confidence in the concentration determination is not acceptable for standard reporting. A zero (0) imples no sampling performed for that parameter. metadata

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Ambient Biomonitoring Network (AMNET): This data represents point sites sampled by NJDEP as part of its Ambient Biomonitoring Network (AMNET). Sites are sampled in every Watershed Management Area (WMA) in the State. Historically, the New Jersey Impairment Score (NJIS), based on family level taxonomy, was used for the entire state to make assessments at three levels of impairment; non-impaired, moderately impaired, and severely impaired. Indices were developed, based on genus level taxonomy and grouped into three distinct geographical regions: high gradient (above the Fall Line), low gradient (Coastal Plain excluding the Pinelands), and Pinelands (the boundary of the Pinelands National Reserve plus a 5-km buffer). These indices are called High Gradient Macroinvertebrate Index (HGMI), Coastal Plain Macroinvertebrate Index (CPMI), and the Pinelands Macroinvertebrate Index (PMI). hese indices replace the NJIS and offer a greater level of resolution using four levels of assessment; excellent, good, fair, and poor. Round 1 data has been assessed using NJIS, while all subsequent rounds are assessed using the HGMI, CPMI, or PMI. metadata

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Areas in Need of Redevelopment: This data set is a spatial representation of Areas in Need of Redevelopment/Rehabilitation. Areas in Need are defined and mapped through the redevelopment process as defined and governed by constitutional, statutory, and regulatory requirements. These requirements are in turn molded by court decisions that affect the way the laws are applied. metadata

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Areas of Interest Blocks: The blocks shown in this layer indicate areas chosen by different wind farm developers for exploration and leasing. These are estimated areas, and may change in the future and are roughly depicted in the general locations shown. Blocks with name attributes are SPECIFIC locations, and should be distinguished between other projects (un-named blocks) where these areas overlap. metadata

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Areas of Interest NM Lines: This data depicts the 7 and 22.5 Nautical Mile Area of Interest lines.The proposed 'Area of Interest' is located off the coast of New Jersey beginning seven nautical miles (7 NM) from the shore and extending roughly 23 NM seaward (or the approximate 100 ft depth contour) and extending 72 nm along the Federal/State boundary from Seaside Park south to Hereford Inlet. Note that the original OWPEBS area is approximately 1,360 square NM. The proposed RFI area is approximately 1070 square NM and contains approximately 97 whole OCS blocks and 44 partial OCS blocks (1/16th of a block). Generally OCS blocks are 9 square nm. Included within this area are several avoidance zones considered to be ecologically sensitive and which may not be suitable to development. See Attached Map Number 1: Proposed Area of Interest.Delineation of Area of Interest:The NJDEP used data collected during its Ocean/Wind Power Ecological Baseline Studies to develop an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) to serve as a guide in identify areas of sensitivity within the study area based on features ranging from physical obstructions and usages to the presence and density of biological resources including avian populations and aquatic habitat. metadata

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Auto Body Shops: Autobody Repair Facilities are points representing the locations of autobody repair facilities regulated by NJDEP. The NJDEP New Jersey Environmental Management System (NJEMS) serves as the database that supplies coordinates and descriptive attributes from several tables used to generate this GIS layer. This layer is produced primarily for the NJDEP i-MapNJ ArcIMS interactive mapping web application and ArcGIS (ArcView, ArcInfo) users. Program interests included in NJEMS are: Air, Communications Center, Discharge Prevention, Exams and Licensing, Fish Game and Wildlife, Green Acres, Hazardous Waste, Lab Certification, Land Use, Landscape Irrigation, Parks and Forestry, Pesticides, Pinelands, Planning, Radiation, Right-to-Know, Site Remediation, Soil Conservation, Solid Waste, TCPA, Water Quality, Water Supply, and Watershed Management. The locations derived using GPS represent main entrance or front door locations for the sites. Users should note that not every site in NJEMS presently (as of August 2006) has an established coordinate (GPS or otherwise). NJDEP is continually working to acquire these with GPS, location data submitted to permitting programs, and through address matching techniques. metadata

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Average Annual Solar PV Resource: Monthly and annual average solar resource potential for 48 Contiguous United States. metadata

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Avoidance Zones: This data depicts the Avoidance Zones, which are based on the concentration of cumulative rankings based on various ecological and physical attributes found in the Study Area.Delineation of Area of Interest:The NJDEP used data collected during its Ocean/Wind Power Ecological Baseline Studies to develop an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) to serve as a guide in identify areas of sensitivity within the study area based on features ranging from physical obstructions and usages to the presence and density of biological resources including avian populations and aquatic habitat. The attached Map Number 2: Areas of Sensitivity and Avoidance Zones within NJ Baseline Ecological Study Area delineates the portion of the study area that should not be considered for development due to the presence and number of cumulative features (categories/features in order of priority are listed below). The development of these "Avoidance Zones" may have greater adverse impacts to the physical and ecological integrity and existing usage of this area. It is important to note that this map is meant to serve as a guide only, and may best illustrate where the most environmentally sensitive and conflicting use areas are anticipated based on information currently available to the Department. The areas identified with the Baseline Ecological Study Area for avoidance are as follows:Northern portion of the study area which includes a major shipping lane and additional telecommunications cables. High bird densities are also present in this area due to a number of shoals and artificial underwater features, which have shown to be positively correlated with avian populations.Southernmost section of the study area where a large number of shoals and biological resources are concentrated (e.g. birds, marine mammals, sea turtles), including Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and Essential Fish Habitat (EFH), which increases the areas sensitivity to development. metadata

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Barnegat Bay Boundary: The delineation of this boundary is to identify the drainage area of the Bay. So, the runoff from the land within the boundary will have a potential impact to the Bay, both water quantity wise and water quality wise.
A total of 84 Units with "Barnegat Bay" listed as "Watershed Management Area Name" in HUC14 coverage (Version 20110225) were selected first. And then 6 units in the ocean area were removed (i.e. 02040301910010, 02040301910020, 02040301910030, 02040301920010, 02040301920020 and 02040301920030). The remaining 78 units were merged as one polygon to generate this boundary. metadata

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Barnegat Bay Funded Stormwater Projects: The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust are jointly working to effectuate meaningful water quality improvements in the Barnegat Bay Watershed as a component of the Governor's Comprehensive Plan of Action. A primary objective of the State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2012 New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Financing Program (NJEIFP) is to fund projects designed to remove pollutants that adversely impact the Barnegat Bay.
There are two types of projects funded in the SFY 2012 - Stormwater Basin Retrofit and Equipment ( e.g., street sweepers, vacuum trucks) Purchase. For basin retrofit projects, the data shows the location of the basin area that are being funded through NJEIFP. For the equipment purchase projects, the shape file shows the township(s) boundary for which the equipment is being purchased through NJEIFP. metadata

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Barnegat Bay Water Quality Monitoring Sites: The Barnegat Bay Sampling Project provides water quality data to 1) determine the locations and extent of water quality impairments, 2) identify numeric criteria or loading targets for nutrients, including the need to revise existing SWQS to set the restoration endpoints (revisions may be needed to reflect a better link to supporting designated uses or where natural conditions would preclude support) and 3) calibrate and validate modeling tools that can be used to direct water quality restoration of the bay.
The data was created to show the public, project partners and DEP staff the location of the monitoring sites, to identify the partners monitoring those sites, to identify existing monitoring locations that are coincident with these sites and to provide links to monitoring results, site photos and sketches and to the actual monitoring results. metadata

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Bear Incidents 2010-2012: This dataset represents the locations of bear incidents and sightings reported to NJDEP from 2010 onward. NJDEP's NJEMS database is the data repository for the collection of this data, reported to NJDEP via DEP Communications, and the Black Bear program located in Clinton, NJ on the Clinton WMA. The dataset's locations were determined using an address matching (geocoding) process on incident data reported to NJEMS. Additional data from NJEMS was used to supply attribute data concerning the incident. metadata

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Bedrock - Surface Topography: The Bedrock-Surface Topography of New Jersey data set shows the bedrock-surface topography of New Jersey. The bedrock-surface topography shows the elevation of the top of the bedrock or Coastal Plain formations in areas where the surficial materials are generally more than 25 feet thick. metadata

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Bedrock Aquifers: The Bedrock Aquifers of New Jersey consists of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) coverage (shapefile) of the bedrock aquifers and confining units in New Jersey. The bedrock-aquifer coverage includes fractured-rock aquifers of the Valley and Ridge, Highlands, and Piedmont physiographic provinces, and aquifers and confining units of the Coastal Plain physiographic province. The coverage is generalized to the 1:250,000 scale by eliminating polygons with less than 1,000,000 sq. ft. area (about 23 acres). The data were digitized from various published and unpublished 1:24,000, 1:100,000, and 1:250,000 scale geologic maps compiled from 1987 to 1993. metadata

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Bedrock Geology: The Bedrock Geology of New Jersey consists of statewide data layers (contacts). The GIS data were scanned and digitized from United States Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations and Open-File Series 1:100,000 scale geologic maps compiled from 1984 to 1993. metadata

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Bedrock Geology Cross-sections: The Bedrock Geology Cross Section Lines data set depicts the sections lines for the corresponding cross section of the Bedrock Geology of New Jersey, which consists of statewide and countywide data layers (contacts, folds, dikes). metadata

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Bedrock Outcrop: Bedrock Outcrops of New Jersey shows the extent of outcropping bedrock materials in northern and central New Jersey exclusive of the Coastal Plain. Two units are used: one showing where surficial materials are generally absent and bedrock outcrop is extensive and one showing where surficial materials are generally less than ten feet thick and bedrock outcrop is scattered. metadata

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Brownfield Development Area (Block and Lots): The data included in the layer enables GIS to map, as polygons, the extents of all current Brownfield Development Areas (BDAs) in New Jersey. A brownfield is any former or current commercial or industrial site that is currently vacant or underutilized and on which there has been, or there is suspected to have been, a discharge of contamination. metadata

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Brownfield Development Area (Outline): This is a graphical representation of the outline boundary for Brownfield Development Areas (BDA) in New Jersey. A brownfield is any former or current commercial or industrial site that is currently vacant or underutilized and on which there has been, or there is suspected to have been, a discharge of contamination. metadata

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CAFRA: CAFRA stands for the Coastal Area Facilities Review Act. The act was instituted to regulate development in the coastal areas of the state. It establishes guidelines for what types of development will be allowed in the coastal zone, and includes a permit review procedure to determine project suitability. The boundary depicted here defines the specific areas of the state that come under CAFRA jurisdiction. For more information on the rule and the CAFRA program, go to http://www.state.nj.us/dep/legal/cafra/adopt.html metadata

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CAFRA and Coastal Centers: CAFRA stands for the Coastal Area Facilities Review Act. The act was instituted to regulate development in the coastal areas of the state. It establishes guidelines for what types of development will be allowed in the coastal zone, and includes a permit review procedure to determine project suitability. The boundary depicted here defines the specific areas of the state that come under CAFRA jurisdiction. This data layer is a depiction of the boundaries of CAFRA centers, CAFRA cores, CAFRA nodes, mainland coastal centers, and non-mainland coastal centers used in CAFRA permitting by the NJDEP. CAFRA centers, cores and nodes are those centers, cores and nodes, respectively, that have been adopted by the State Planning Commission and reviewed and accepted by the Department for the purposes of CAFRA. For more information on the rule and the CAFRA program, go to http://www.state.nj.us/dep/legal/cafra/adopt.html metadata

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CAFRA Coastal Planning Areas: CAFRA stands for the Coastal Area Facilities Review Act. The act was instituted to regulate development in the coastal areas of the state. It establishes guidelines for what types of development will be allowed in the coastal zone, and includes a permit review procedure to determine project suitability. This data is a depiction of Coastal Planning Area boundaries used in permitting by the NJDEP. Coastal Planning Areas are those planning areas that have been adopted by the State Planning Commission and reviewed and accepted by the Department for the purposes of CAFRA. Planning area boundaries for the CAFRA area (defined at N.J.S.A.13:19-4) were clipped from the splan2 shapefile of the 2001 State Development and Redevelopment Plan (SDRP), updated March 9, 2003 (the last update affecting the CAFRA area). Attributes were modified to reflect the application of the planning areas in the Coastal Zone Management rules, N.J.A.C. 7:7E. For more information on the rule and the CAFRA program, go to http://www.state.nj.us/dep/legal/cafra/adopt.html metadata

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Canals and Water Raceways: New Jersey's canals and water raceways have been important for transportation and water power for the last 300 years. They have played a significant role in the economic development of the state. This data shows locations of current and historic canals and raceways. Where possible, these have been mapped based on site visits or current aerial photographs. The location of some abandoned and filled canals and raceways are approximated from historic maps and photographs and are not guaranteed to be accurate. Some of the mapped canals and raceways are located on private property with no public access. Other canals and raceways allow public access on the canal itself or neighboring pathways, for recreational purposes. The user of this product is responsible for determining if a canal or raceway is open to the public before visiting. This data does not include dewatering canals and ditches with two exceptions, the Berry's Creek Canal and the Old Canal. They were included in this data because they are navigable. Channelized streams and underground aqueducts are not included in this data. metadata

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Category One Waters: ( also known as " C1 waters") C1 Waters are a reselect of the Surface Water Quality Standard's (SWQS) CATEGORY attribute. The information contained in this metadata record reflects the SWQS data. The GIS data is a DRAFT version being released for general distribution as a preliminary product and is not legally binding. NJDEP is releasing this draft version for public review and any potential data errors should be reported to Metadata Reference Contact person listed in this metadata file. As stated in this metadata record's Use Constraints section, NJDEP makes no representations of any kind, including, but not limited to, the warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use, nor are any such warranties to be implied with respect to the digital data layers furnished hereunder. NJDEP assumes no responsibility to maintain them in any manner or form. By downloading this data, user agrees to the data use constraints listed within this metadata record. This data is a digital representation of New Jersey's Surface Water Quality Standards in accordance with "Surface Water Quality Standards for New Jersey Waters" as designated in N.J.A.C. 7:9 B. The Surface Water Quality Standards (SWQS) establish the designated uses to be achieved and specify the water quality (criteria) necessary to protect the State's waters. Designated uses include potable water, propagation of fish and wildlife, recreation, agricultural and industrial supplies, and navigation. These are reflected in use classifications assigned to specific waters. The line-work has been broken/altered to reflect the descriptions specified at N.J.A.C. 7:9B-1.15. When interpreting the stream classifications and anti-degradation designations, the descriptions specified in the SWQS at N.J.A.C. 7:9B-1.15 always take precedence. The GIS layer reflects the stream classifications and anti-degradation designations adopted as of October 16, 2006 is supplemental only and is not legally binding.
Please refer to the data descriptions and metadata for C1 Waters and for Streams for more information. metadata

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Caution Point Feature: NOAA's Electronic Navigational Charts (NOAA ENCs) have been developed to support the marine transportation infrastructure and coastal management. The NOAA ENCs are in S-57, a data standard developed by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) to be used for the exchange of digital hydrographic data. NOAA ENC?s can be used in Geographic Information Systems, (GIS) allowing for broader public access. Many GIS's, however cannot read an ENC's native S-57 format to address this problem. NOAA's ENC? Direct to GIS web portal provides comprehensive access to display, query, and download all available large scale NOAA ENC? data in a variety of GIS/CAD formats for non-navigational purposes using Internet mapping service technology. Nautical chart features contained within an NOAA ENC provide a detailed representation of the U.S. coastal and marine environment. This data includes coastal topography, bathymetry, landmarks, geographic place names and marine boundaries. Features in an NOAA ENC are limited in that they only represent the geographic region that is depicted in that particular NOAA ENC. By aggregating nautical features from all NOAA ENCs in the creation of GIS data, a contiguous depiction of the U.S coastal and marine environment is achieved. metadata

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Child Care Centers: This data is a graphical representation of the listing of licensed active child care centers in NJ. It was created for the State of New Jersey's initiative regarding child care centers near contaminated sites. Non-profit child care centers found in Public Schools (NIPS) are not included in this GIS layer because they are not required to submit environmental data to the NJDEP for NJDCF licensing. These centers may possibly be found on a public school GIS layer (Please see Cross Reference Information for access to this data). Also, proposed child care centers are not listed until a NJDCF License number is issued. The table was pruned to include only active centers amounting at the time of initial generation to 3,391 licensed centers. In addition 873 NIPS were excluded.ADVISORY: This data was created only to be used as guidance to find active child care centers. The data should not be used as the determining factor in conducting receptor evaluations and the actions taken to protect them. The child care data is updated continually and users are hereby notified that data on NJDEP mapping applications for this data set may be more current than any downloadable shapefile, if provided. metadata

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Chromate Sites: Included are those sites within New Jersey where chromate contamination of soil or ground water has been identified; This list of chromate waste sites includes sites where remediation is either currently under way, required but not yet initiated or has been completed. Development of the data set included here dates was initiated in 1995. Note that some of the cases included may have been fully remediated and should no longer be listed; however information-confirming completion of the remediation has not reached this office. As that information is developed the chromate waste site list will be updated. Additionally more chromate waste sites may yet be identified and accordingly are not included here. For further information contact NJDEP's Site Remediation Programs (SRP) lead program, which are identified with each site listed in this database. Contact information for SRPs lead program can acquired at www.state.nj.us/dep/srp. metadata

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Coastline: NOTE: Coastline of New Jersey was extracted from NJDEP's Rivers, Bays and Oceans data layer (shortname = njarea). The majority of descriptive information contained within this metadata record relates to the original source layer Rivers, Bays and Oceans.The NJAREA source file contains generic water body information which was transferred from several sources to polygons extracted from the 2002 Land Use/Land Cover data sets.Photo Interpretation of the 2002 color infrared (CIR) imagery and digitizing of the 2002 Land Use/Land Cover data was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). The data was created by extracting water polygons which represented Rivers, Bays and Oceans from the 2002 land use/land cover (LU/LC) layer from NJ DEP's geographical information systems (GIS) database.The classification system used was a modified Anderson et al., 2002 classification system. Minimum mapping unit (MMU) is 1 acre; however, the data does contains ponds well below the MMU. metadata

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Colleges & Universities: Colleges and Universities in New Jersey The Colleges and Universities dataset is composed of any type of Post Secondary Education such as: colleges, universities, technical schools, trade schools, business schools, satellite (branch) campuses, etc. that grant First Professional, Associate, Bachelors, Masters, or Doctoral degrees.Secondary education facilities, Administrative offices, or Post Secondary Education facilities that are non degree granting schools are intended to be excluded from this dataset, but a few may be included.All data is non license restricted data that has been added from TGS research. The text fields in this dataset have been set to all upper case to facilitate consistent database engine search results. All diacritics (e.g. the German umlaut or the Spanish tilde) have been replaced with their closest equivalent English character to facilitate use with database systems that may not support diacritics. The currentness of this dataset is indicated by the [CONTDATE] attribute. Based upon this attribute, the oldest record dates from 2007/07/03 and the newest record dates from 2007/10/12. metadata

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Congressional Districts: The Congressional Districts (condis) file was created to identify the political districts for New Jersey. The condis file was created from the 1986 State Municipality file (stmun) in ArcInfo software. The DISSOLVE command was used on the district code to create the congressional district boundaries. Information on the congressional district boundaries were obtained from the New Jersey Office of Legislative Information in 1992 which reflects the 1990 census.metadata

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Counties: This data set is a spatial representation of counties in New Jersey developed by the New Jersey Office of Information Technology (OIT), Office of Geographic Information Systems (OGIS). It is not a survey document and should not be used as such. The polygons delineated in this data set do not represent legal boundaries. This data set improves upon previous versions of county boundaries through the integration of coincident features from several high quality source data sets, as a component of the OGIS statewide Parcels Normalization Project concluded in March 2010. metadata

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Critical Environmental and Historic Sites: This data contains the boundaries of Critical Environmental and Historic Sites of the NJ State Development and Redevelopment Plan (NJSDRP). These sites, submitted by county and local entities, are areas generally less than one square mile which include one or more environmentally or historically sensitive features. These sites are recognized by the State Planning Commission. Critical Environmental Sites (CES) and Historic and Cultural Sites (HCS) designations are used to help organize planning for new development or redevelopment by singling out the elements of natural systems, small areas of habitat, historic sites, and other features that should continue to be expressed in the future landscape through protection and restoration. The presence of CES and HCS gives land owners and developers important advance information on how to shape their proposals for development of the land around them, focusing on including them within the design and function of the development whenever possible, while protecting them from adverse impacts. Designating a site as a CES or an HCS means that the site is of local, regional or statewide significance and that its protection and enhancement is of primary importance. metadata

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Crop Residues: The following crops were included in this analysis: corn, wheat, soybeans, cotton, sorghum, barley, oats, rice, rye, canola, dry edible beans, dry edible peas, peanuts, potatoes, safflower, sunflower, sugarcane, and flaxseed. The quantities of crop residues that can be available in each county are estimated using total grain production, crop to residue ratio, moisture content, and taking into consideration the amount of residue left on the field for soil protection, grazing, and other agricultural activities. Source: USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service; five-year average: 2003-2007. metadata

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Deed Notice Areas: This data layer identifies those Known Contaminates Sites (KCS) or sites on Site Remediations Programs' (SRP) Comprehensive Site List (CSL) that have been assigned a Deed notice. Deed Notices are institutional controls in geographically defined areas within which soil remedial cleanup guidelines for specific contaminants have been exceeded. A deed notice is described by NJ State Legislature (NJSA 58:10B-13a) as a "...notice to inform prospective holders of an interest in the property that contamination exists on the property at a level that may statutorily restrict certain uses of, or access to, all or part of that property, a delineation of those restrictions, a description of all specific engineering or institutional controls at the property that exist and that shall be maintained in order to prevent exposure to contaminants remaining on the property, and the written consent to the notice by the owner of the property". The deed notice (polygon) was developed to provide information regarding the spatial extent of soil contamination, as well as information regarding engineering controls (eg. cap or fence) and contamination found in the soils above the appropriate standard. This is aimed to help preserve adequate protection of these contaminated soil regions and helps to minimize any chance of exposure. metadata

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Delaware and Raritan Canal Commission Review Zones: A map of areas defined as Review Zones, that are subject to review and approval by the Delaware and Raritan (D&R) Canal Commission as defined in its "Regulations for the Review Zone of the D&R Canal State Park", adopted August 2004 (N.J.A.C. 7:45). The Commission reviews development projects within its review zone for their impact on the following: 1.) storm drainage and water quality, 2.) stream corridors, 3.) visual and natural quality including historic impact, and 4.) traffic. The "A" Review Zone is the area within 1,000 feet on either side of the center-line of the canal except in Princeton Township where the west bank of Carnegie Lake shall be the boundary of Zone A and where the Raritan River is within 1,000 feet, its furthest bank being the boundary. The "B" Review Zone is based upon sub-watersheds in central New Jersey that impact the D&R Canal State Park. metadata

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Dikes: The Bedrock Geology of New Jersey consists of statewide data layers (dikes). The GIS data were scanned and digitized from United States Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations and Open-File Series 1:100,000 scale geologic maps compiled from 1984 to 1993. metadata

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Drought Regions: Drought regions provide a regulatory basis for coordinating local responses to regional water-supply shortages. The six drought regions are based on watershed and water-supply considerations. The drought regions are designed to assist the DEP in declaring drought warnings and emergencies in New Jersey during times of decreased precipitation, and current or anticipated water-supply shortages. By having different regions it is possible for the State to declare drought warnings or emergencies in different regions. These warnings and emergencies are declared by the Governor of the State of New Jersey. The State's response to a drought is coordinated by the NJDEP Water Supply Administration. metadata

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Dry Cleaners: Dry Cleaning Facilities are points representing the locations of dry cleaning facilities regulated by NJDEP. The NJDEP New Jersey Environmental Management System (NJEMS) serves as the database that supplies coordinates and descriptive attributes from several tables used to generate this GIS layer. This layer is produced primarily for the NJDEP i-MapNJ ArcIMS interactive mapping web application and ArcGIS (ArcView, ArcInfo) users. Program interests included in NJEMS are: Air, Communications Center, Discharge Prevention, Exams and Licensing, Fish Game and Wildlife, Green Acres, Hazardous Waste, Lab Certification, Land Use, Landscape Irrigation, Parks and Forestry, Pesticides, Pinelands, Planning, Radiation, Right-to-Know, Site Remediation, Soil Conservation, Solid Waste, TCPA, Water Quality, Water Supply, and Watershed Management. The locations derived using GPS represent main entrance or front door locations for the sites. Users should note that not every site in NJEMS presently (as of August 2006) has an established coordinate (GPS or otherwise). NJDEP is continually working to acquire these with GPS, location data submitted to permitting programs, and through address matching techniques. metadata

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Earthquake Epicenters: This contains earthquakes with epicenters in New Jersey. Most are minor with magnitudes ranging from 0.4 to 5.3 and depths up to 25km below sea level. Earthquakes with magnitude of 0 (zero) implies that the magnitude is unkown. metadata

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Ecological Baseline Study Area: This zone will be surveyed from the area adjacent to Seaside Park (approximate latitude/longitude 39º 55' 56" N, 74º 04' 10" W) south to Stone Harbor (approximate latitude/longitude 39º 01' 58" N, 74º 46' 11" W) and extending 20 nautical miles perpendicular to the shoreline. This area is approximately 1,360 square nautical miles (i.e., 68 x 20 nautical miles) in size. metadata

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Electric Utilities Territory Map: This data provides graphic representation of electric company territories of New Jersey. Data was compiled using Electric Utility paper maps, all greater than 1:500,000. It is anticipated that electric company territorial boundaries will remain stable. metadata

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Elevation Contours: This dataset is a graphical representation of New Jersey's statewide elevation contours with twenty foot intervals. It was created from the USGS DEM 100 meter lattice.
metadata

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EPA STORET Water Quality Monitoring Stations: The EPA STORET data maintains the locations of water quality monitoring stations from EPA's STORET (Modernized) database. This EPA STORET layers consists of stations that are monitored by agencies other than NJDEP. There is a separate NJDEP STORET layer that consists of stations monitored by NJDEP. A station is a location at which a data collection event takes place, such a collection of a field sample, measurement of field parameters or evaluation of environmental habitats. EPA STORET maintains water quality monitoring data from January 1, 1999 to the present. Note: water quality monitoring data sampled prior to this date is stored in EPA's Legacy STORET database. metadata

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Farmland Preservation Program: The NJFPP geospatial dataset (ESRI shape file) is a subset of the NJFARMS geospatial dataset (ESRI polygon coverage) developed for GIS. The polygons represent selected features from the New Jersey State Farmland Preservation Program (NJSFPP) that are available for public distribution. Included in this dataset are all farms that have been preserved in the NJSFPP; and farms that have received final approval for funding to the NJSFPP. The NJFPP shape file has a relational database containing attributes for the various aspects of the Program. The New Jersey Department of Agriculture (NJDA), State Agriculture Development Committee (SADC), administers the NJSFPP. The NJFPP dataset represents the status of the Program from January 23, 1983, inception of the program, through the current publication date.DISCLAIMERAny use of this product with respect to accuracy and precision shall be the sole responsibility of the user. The configuration and geo-referenced location of parcel polygons in this data layer are approximate and were developed primarily for planning purposes. The geodetic accuracy and precision of the GIS data contained in this file and map shall not be, nor are intended to be, relied upon in matters requiring delineation and location of true ground horizontal and/or vertical controls as would be obtained by an actual ground survey conducted by a licensed Professional Land Surveyor. metadata

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Faults: The Bedrock Geology of New Jersey consists of statewide data layers ( faults). The GIS data were scanned and digitized from United States Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations and Open-File Series 1:100,000 scale geologic maps compiled from 1984 to 1993. metadata

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Federal Sites with Large-Scale Solar PV Potential: Renewable energy production is expected to increase significantly in the next 25 years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Center for Program Analysis (OCPA) has initiated the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative to demonstrate the enormous potential that contaminated land and mining sites provide for developing renewable energy in the U.S. metadata

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Federal Sites with Biomass Potential: This data is a graphical representation of the EPA/NJDEP Re-Powering America's Land (RPAL) Biomass Site List for New Jersey, November 2009. Biomass is material that comes from living things, including trees, crops, grasses, and animals and animal waste. Some kinds of biomass, such as wood and biofuels, can be burned to produce energy. Hundreds of thousands of acres will be needed to meet the projected demand for renewable energy generation over the next twenty years. This demand will put significant development pressure on greenfields and agricultural land which serve as a critical carbon sink, protect watersheds and wetlands, provide habitat, and provide raw resources and food. Through the RE-Powering America?Ts Land Initiative, EPA is encouraging the development of renewable energy on contaminated land and mine sites that have been cleaned up and revitalized, as an alternative to developing renewable energy on previously undeveloped land.EPA is taking a multi-pronged approach to encourage the reuse of contaminated land and mine sites for renewable energy production, by:-Demonstrating the potential of contaminated land and mine sites for renewable energy.-EPA has partnered with the Department of Energy?Ts National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop criteria to evaluate contaminated land and mine sites across the country for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, and landfill gas methane development potential. Using this criteria, EPA has evaluated EPA tracked Brownfields, RCRA, Superfund, landfill, and abandoned mine sites for renewable energy potential. EPA has evaluated more than 11,000 EPA-tracked sites and nearly 15 million acres with potential for developing solar, wind, biomass and geothermal facilities. metadata

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Federal State Boundary: This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act boundary line (alsoknown as State Seaward Boundary (SSB) and Fed State Boundary) in ESRIArc/Info export and Arc/View shape file formats for the MMS AtlanticRegion. The SLA defines the seaward limit of a state's submerged landsand the landward boundary of federally managed OCS lands. In the MMSAtlantic Region it is projected 3 nautical miles offshore from thebaseline. Further information on the SLA and development of this linefrom baseline points can be found in OCS Report MMS 99-0006: BoundaryDevelopment on the Outer Continental Shelf.Because GIS projection and topology functions can change orgeneralize coordinates, these GIS files are NOT an OFFICIAL record forthe exact Submerged Lands Act Boundary. metadata

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Fish Index Of Biotic Integrity: This data represents the NJDEP Fish Index of Biotic Integrity Monitoring Network sample point locations for the years 2000 to 2005. A FIBI is an index that measures the health of a stream based on multiple attributes of the resident fish assemblage. Each site sampled is scored based on its deviation from reference conditions (i.e., what would be found in an unimpacted stream) and classified as "poor", "fair", "good" or "excellent". metadata

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Folds: The Bedrock Geology of New Jersey consists of statewide data layers ( folds). The GIS data were scanned and digitized from United States Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations and Open-File Series 1:100,000 scale geologic maps compiled from 1984 to 1993. metadata

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Forest Residues: This category includes logging residues and other removable material left after carrying out silviculture operations and site conversions. Logging residue comprises unused portions of trees, cut or killed by logging and left in the woods. Other removable materials are the unutilized volume of trees cut or killed during logging operations. Source: USDA, Forest Service's Timber Product Output database, 2007. metadata

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Gas Stations: Gas Service Stations are points representing the locations of gasoline services stations regulated by NJDEP. The NJDEP New Jersey Environmental Management System (NJEMS) serves as the database that supplies coordinates and descriptive attributes from several tables used to generate this GIS layer. This layer is produced primarily for the NJDEP i-MapNJ ArcIMS interactive mapping web application and ArcGIS (ArcView, ArcInfo) users. Program interests included in NJEMS are: Air, Communications Center, Discharge Prevention, Exams and Licensing, Fish Game and Wildlife, Green Acres, Hazardous Waste, Lab Certification, Land Use, Landscape Irrigation, Parks and Forestry, Pesticides, Pinelands, Planning, Radiation, Right-to-Know, Site Remediation, Soil Conservation, Solid Waste, TCPA, Water Quality, Water Supply, and Watershed Management. The locations derived using GPS represent main entrance or front door locations for the sites. Users should note that not every site in NJEMS presently (as of August 2006) has an established coordinate (GPS or otherwise). NJDEP is continually working to acquire these with GPS, location data submitted to permitting programs, and through address matching techniques. metadata

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Gravity Anomalies (1 mgal): Gravity anomalies are produced by density variations within the rocks of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Mapping of these density variations is the primary use of gravity anomalies. Gravity Anomalies of New Jersey are bouguer gravity contours (lines) at 1 milligal intervals. The contours are based on gravity data in New Jersey and vicinity. The New Jersey contours were clipped at the state outline.The bouguer anomalies in New Jersey range from a low of -58 milligals to a high of +37milligals. metadata

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Groundwater Contamination Areas (CEA): This data layer identifies those Known Contaminated Sites or sites on the Site Remediation Program (SRP) Comprehensive Site List where groundwater contamination has been identified and, where appropriate, the NJDEP has established a Classification Exception Area (CEA). CEAs are institutional controls in geographically defined areas within which the New Jersey Ground Water Quality Standards (NJGWQS) for specific contaminants have been exceeded. When a CEA is designated for an area, the constituent standards and designated aquifer uses are suspended for the term of the CEA. For further information about Classification Exception Areas: http://www.state.nj.us/dep/srp/regs/guidance.htm#cea. For further information on NJDEP's SRP lead programs (which are identified with each CEA site listed in this database), check the web at http://www.state.nj.us/dep/srp. metadata

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Groundwater Contamination Areas(CKE): This data layer contains information about areas in the state which are specified as the Currently Known Extent (CKE) of ground water pollution. CKE areas are geographically defined areas within which the local ground water resources are known to be compromised because the water quality exceeds drinking water and ground water quality standards for specific contaminants. Historically, a number of the CKEs have also been identified as Well Restriction Areas (WRAs). The regulatory authority for developing CKEs is in N.J.A.C. 7:1J, entitled Processing of Damage Claims Pursuant to the Spill Compensation and Control Act. CKEs are used by NJDEP staff, water purveyors, and local officials to make decisions concerning appropriate treatment and/or replacement of contaminated drinking water supplies.
For further information contact NJDEPs Site Remediation Programs (SRP) Bureau of Site Management (BSM) the lead program, for CKE case oversight. Contact information for SRPs lead program can be acquired at http://www.state.nj.us/dep/srp. metadata

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Groundwater Recharge Areas: An estimation of ground-water recharge for New Jersey. Ground-water recharge is estimated using the NJGS methodology from NJ Geological Survey Report GSR-32 "A Method for Evaluation of Ground-Water-Recharge Areas in New Jersey. Land-use/land-cover, soil and municipality-based climatic data were combined and used to produce an estimate of ground-water recharge in inches/year. Recharge was then ranked by volume (billions of gallons/year) using natural breaks in the percentage of total volume.metadata

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Groundwater Treatment Facility Source Water Areas: This GIS data-set represents the source water areas (up to 12-year time of travel) for the combined wells for each active public community groundwater drinking water treatment facility in NJ (as of 200301). A groundwater source water area (also referred to as well head protection areas (WHPA)) is a calculated area around a well, which delineates the horizontal extent of ground water captured by a well pumping at a specific rate over a two-, five-, and twelve-year period. For more information on the groundwater source water areas refer to http://www.state.nj.us/dep/njgs/geodata/dgs02-2.htm. The source water assessment process determined the susceptibility (Low, Medium, or High) of each treatment facility to 8 contaminant groups (Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Precursors, Inorganics, Nutrients, Pathogens, Pesticides, Radionuclides, Radon, and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)) which can also be linked to for geographical display. metadata

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Head of Tide: This is a graphical representation of the head of tide (hot) points for watercourses of New Jersey. This includes the tributaries of these watercourses as well. metadata

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Highlands: This dataset is an interpretation of the Highlands Preservation and Planning Area Boundary as described by the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act of 2004. This dataset was created by utilizing the Highlands Parcel Base, the NJDEP Hydrography Layer for 2002 and the New Jersey Department of Transportation Local Road Files as references to the act description. For more information on the Highlands, go to, http://www.highlands.state.nj.us/. metadata

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Historic Archaeological Site Grid: This dataset includes a vector grid of approximately 1/2 mile cells indicating the presence of archaeological sites that:
1. Are included in the New Jersey or National Registers of Historic Places,
2. Have been determined Eligible for inclusion through federal or state processes as administered by the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (HPO), or
3. Have been identified through cultural resources survey conducted pursuant to federal or state processes as administered by the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (HPO).
Archaeological sites are particularly sensitive to destruction and vandalism, and this grid format protects specific site locations while alerting users of this data to the potential presence of archaeological resources in their area of interest. This format is consistent with National Register guidelines. Inclusion in this dataset does not preclude the existence of other sites as yet unidentified. metadata

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Historic Districts: This dataset represents those historic districts that:
1. Are included in the New Jersey or National Registers of Historic Places,
2. Have been determined Eligible for inclusion through federal or state processes as administered by the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (HPO), or
3. Have been identified through federal or state processes as administered by the HPO.
The majority of features in the dataset represent categories 1 and 2 above. HPO has not yet begun comprehensive digitizing for category 3. Inclusion in this dataset does not preclude the existence of other Historic Districts as yet unidentified. metadata

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Historic Fill: The "Brownfield and Contaminated Site Remediation Act" (N.J.S.A. 58:10B-1 et seq.) requires the Department of Environmental Protection to map regions of the state where large areas of historic fill exist and make this information available to the public. This map shows areas of historic fill covering more than approximately 5 acres. For the purposes of this map, historic fill is non-indigenous material placed on a site in order to raise the topographic elevation of the site. No representation is made as to the composition of the fill or presence of contamination in the fill. Some areas mapped as fill may contain chemical-production waste or ore-processing waste that exclude them from the legislative definition of historic fill. Fill was mapped from stereo aerial photography taken in March 1979, supplemented in places by planimetric aerial photography taken in the spring of 1991 and 1992. Additional areas of fill were mapped by comparing areas of swamp, marsh, and floodplain shown on archival topographic and geologic maps on file at the N. J. Geological Survey, dated between 1840 and 1910, to their modern extent. In a few places, fill was mapped from field observations and from drillers' logs of wells and borings. Most urban and suburban areas are underlain by a discontinuous layer of excavated indigenous soil mixed with varying amounts of non-indigenous material. This material generally does not meet the definition of historic fill and is not depicted on this map. Also, there may be historic fills that are not detectable on aerial photography or by archival map interpretation and so are not shown on this map, particularly along streams in urban and suburban areas. metadata

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Historic Properties: This dataset represents those Historic Properties that:
1. Are included in the New Jersey or National Registers of Historic Places,
2. Have been determined Eligible for inclusion through federal or state processes as administered by the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (HPO), or
3. Have been identified through federal or state processes as administered by the HPO.
The majority of features in the dataset represent categories 1 and 2 above. HPO has not yet begun comprehensive digitizing for category 3. Inclusion in this dataset does not preclude the existence of other Historic Districts as yet unidentified. metadata

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Hydropower Generation Facilities: These five locations represent all the active Hydro Generation Facilities that have Water Allocation Approvals including Permits (WAP), Water Use Registrations (WUR), and Permit Equivalencies (EQP). Hydropower sites are permitted through NJDEP's Bureau of Water Allocation and Well Permitting if they divert or have the capability to divert > 100,000 gallons of water per day. These five facilities have Water Allocation Permits with a Water Use Type designation of, "Power Generation. metadata

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Imagery: 2012 Natural: Digital orthophotography of New Jersey, distributed as a Web Map Service (WMS). There are two layers in the service, one displaying the 3 natural color bands, the other displaying 3 band false color infrared (near IR). The native data set spatial reference system is State Plane Coordinate System NAD83 Coordinates, U.S. Survey Feet. In most client software, the default spatial reference system of the service will be Geographic Coordinates, WGS84. Several other coordinate systems are supported (see Distribution Information section).Multi-spectral digital orthophotography was produced at a scale of 1:2400 (1" = 200') with a 1 foot pixel resolution for the entire state, totaling approximately 8,162 square miles.Digital orthophotography combines the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. Each digitized perspective aerial photograph is rectified for camera lens distortion, vertical displacement caused by terrain relief and variations in aircraft altitude and orientation. metadata

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Imagery: 2012 Infrared: Digital orthophotography of New Jersey, distributed as a Web Map Service (WMS). There are two layers in the service, one displaying the 3 natural color bands, the other displaying 3 band false color infrared (near IR). The native data set spatial reference system is State Plane Coordinate System NAD83 Coordinates, U.S. Survey Feet. In most client software, the default spatial reference system of the service will be Geographic Coordinates, WGS84. Several other coordinate systems are supported (see Distribution Information section).Multi-spectral digital orthophotography was produced at a scale of 1:2400 (1" = 200') with a 1 foot pixel resolution for the entire state, totaling approximately 8,162 square miles.Digital orthophotography combines the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. Each digitized perspective aerial photograph is rectified for camera lens distortion, vertical displacement caused by terrain relief and variations in aircraft altitude and orientation. metadata

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Imagery: 2007 Natural: Digital orthophotography of New Jersey, distributed as a Web Map Service (WMS). There are numerous layers in the service, one displaying the 2007 3 natural color bands, another displaying 2007 3 band false color infrared (near IR). The native data set spatial reference system is State Plane Coordinate System NAD83 Coordinates, U.S. Survey Feet. In most client software, the default spatial reference system of the service will be Geographic Coordinates, WGS84. Several other coordinate systems are supported (see Distribution Information section).Multi-spectral digital orthophotography was produced at a scale of 1:2400 (1" = 200') with a 1 foot pixel resolution for the State of New Jersey totaling approximately 8,162 square miles. The GeoTIFF tiles delivered to the State of New Jersey were then converted to lossless JPEG2000 files, which are used in this service.Aerial photography of the entire State of New Jersey was captured during March-May, 2007. Two flight dates (4-30-07 and 5-3-07 were rejected from the original 2007 flight due to excessive leaf conditions. Spring 2008 re-flights were planned and acquired in three missions dating: April 3rd, 10th, and 15th of 2008. The final orthophotos for parts of Warren, Hunterdon, Sussex, Passaic, Essex, Union, and all of Bergen and Hudson Counties were created utilizing both years of imagery. metadata

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Imagery: 2007 Infrared: Digital orthophotography of New Jersey, distributed as a Web Map Service (WMS). There are numerous layers in the service, one displaying the 2007 3 natural color bands, another displaying 2007 3 band false color infrared (near IR). The native data set spatial reference system is State Plane Coordinate System NAD83 Coordinates, U.S. Survey Feet. In most client software, the default spatial reference system of the service will be Geographic Coordinates, WGS84. Several other coordinate systems are supported (see Distribution Information section).Multi-spectral digital orthophotography was produced at a scale of 1:2400 (1" = 200') with a 1 foot pixel resolution for the State of New Jersey totaling approximately 8,162 square miles. The GeoTIFF tiles delivered to the State of New Jersey were then converted to lossless JPEG2000 files, which are used in this service.Aerial photography of the entire State of New Jersey was captured during March-May, 2007. Two flight dates (4-30-07 and 5-3-07 were rejected from the original 2007 flight due to excessive leaf conditions. Spring 2008 re-flights were planned and acquired in three missions dating: April 3rd, 10th, and 15th of 2008. The final orthophotos for parts of Warren, Hunterdon, Sussex, Passaic, Essex, Union, and all of Bergen and Hudson Counties were created utilizing both years of imagery. metadata

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Imagery: 2002 Infrared: Digital orthophotography of New Jersey, distributed as an Open Geospatial Consortium compliant Web Map Service (WMS). The map service includes an image data set of digital color infrared orthophotography of New Jersey from 2002.The native data set spatial reference system is State Plane Coordinate System NAD83 Coordinates, U.S. Survey Feet. In most client software, the default spatial reference system of the service will be Geographic Coordinates, WGS84. Several other coordinate systems are supported (see Supplemental Information; and the Distribution Information section).Digital orthophotography combines the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. Digital orthophotography is a process which converts aerial photography from an original photo negative to a digital product that has been positionally corrected for camera lens distortion, vertical displacement and variations in aircraft altitude and orientation. The imagery was captured at a negative scale of 1" = 1600' in the spring of 2002, under leaf-off conditions, on color-infrared film. The ortho-rectification process has achieved a +/-4.0 ft. horizontal accuracy at a 95% confidence level, National Standard for Spatial Data Accuracy (NSSDA). The final product has a nominal scale of 1:2400.The georeferenced TIFF tiles delivered to the State of New Jersey were then converted to lossless JPEG2000 files, which are used in this service. HOWEVER, the Web Map Service does not have exactly the same spatial accuracy as the original imagery, due to resampling. Files of the 2002 digital orthophotography are available in several other formats, including downloadable MrSID tiles from the New Jersey Image Warehouse, and both TIFF images and MrSID images on hard media from the EROS Data Center. See separate metadata record for the MrSID data for details. metadata

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Imagery: 1995 Infrared: These images are known as Digital Color Infrared Ortho Quarterquads. The term 'Color Infrared' refers to the fact that the film used to capture these images was sensitive to infrared radiation, as opposed to visible radiation, which would be used in a standard image. The term 'Quarterquad' refers to the size of the tile, which is 1/4 of a standard USGS topoquad. These images were produced through a New Jersey/USGS partnership, requiring that the images meet USGS tile specifications. The term 'Ortho' refers to the fact that these images have undergone a special process, Ortho-rectification, to render them spatially accurate at the 1:12,000 scale that they were produced. As can be done with a map, distances and locations can be accurately measured from these images. metadata

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Imagery: 1977 Tidelands Basemaps: This Web Map Service publishes the series of chronopaque photo-basemaps known as the "1977 Tidelands Basemaps." The maps were scanned and georeferenced using the NJDEP Tidelands Grid vector data layer as the reference data set. Cropped versions of geo-referenced images are made available in this WMS. metadata

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Imagery: 1970 NJDEP Wetlands Basemaps: This Web Map Service publishes the series of chronoflex photo-basemaps known as the "1970 Wetlands Basemaps." These maps were scanned and geo-referenced using the NJDEP Tidelands Grid vector data layer as the reference data set. Cropped versions of the geo-referenced images are made available in this WMS. metadata

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Imagery: 1930 Black and White: This OGC compliant Web Map Service includes a historical image data set of a mosaic of black and white photography of New Jersey from the early 1930s. The source imagery was hand cut to produce 261 mosaic tile prints on linen-backed paper. The data set for this service was produced by scanning these mosaic tile prints at 400 dpi and saved as TIFF images. The scanned TIFF images had an approximate pixel resolution of 6.5 feet. They were georeferenced against 1995/97 color infrared digital orthophotography. The georeferenced TIFFs were clipped and converted into other image formats. The digital product has not been corrected for distortion or vertical displacement. They do not meet the National Standard for Spatial Data Accuracy (NSSDA). metadata

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Imagery: Historical Maps: This Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Service (WMS) includes a mosaic of historical USGS topographic maps of New Jersey surveyed from 1881 to 1924. The WMS is georeferenced to Geographic WGS84. The mosaic was produced by scanning 15 minute (1:62,500 scale) historical USGS topographic paper maps at 600 dpi and saving them as Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) images. The scanned TIFFs have an approximate pixel resolution of 17 feet. The Milford 1913 and Bushkill 1924 map images were obtained from the USGS Delaware Basin Project website (http://mcmcweb.er.usgs.gov/de_river_basin/de_water_gap/data_list.html) because they were missing from the original historical map set. They were added to the mosaic to provide full coverage of New Jersey. A "fishnet" of 15 minute tiles was created to georeference the map images. The fishnet was created in the maps' native coordinate system, Clarke 1866, and re-projected to New Jersey State Plane feet NAD83. The TIFFs were then georeferenced to the tiles and clipped to remove the collars (border areas of the maps). The TIFFs were converted to JPEG2000 files to be used in the mosaic for the WMS. The spatial reference of the WMS is Geographic WGS84.This product is to be used for reference purposes only. The original historical paper maps were distorted or damaged to varying degrees due to age and use. During visual testing, it appeared that spatial inaccuracies in the images exceed 200 feet in several locations. The digital product has not been corrected for distortion nor vertical displacement. Consequently, this product does not meet the National Standard for Spatial Data Accuracy (NSSDA). metadata

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Imagery: USDA 2013 Natural: This Web Map Service (WMS) layer serves natural color imagery from the 2013 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) for New Jersey. NAIP acquires 4-band digital ortho imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in the U.S. A primary goal of the NAIP program is to enable availability of of ortho imagery within sixty days of acquisition. The source imagery used is 1 meter ground sample distance (GSD) ortho imagery rectified within +/- 6 meters to true ground at a 95% confidence level. NAIP imagery is formatted to the UTM coordinate system using NAD83. NAIP imagery may contain as much as 10% cloud cover per tile. Georeferenced Tagged Image File Format (GeoTIFFs) for NJ were acquired by the NJ Office of Information Technology and reprocessed for the WMS. See Data Quality>Lineage for details.Please note that the WMS resamples the data, so the locations and characteristics of features shown by the service are not identical to the reprocessed image files. metadata

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Imagery: USDA 2010 Natural: This Web Map Service (WMS) layer serves natural color imagery from the 2010 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) for New Jersey. NAIP acquires digital ortho imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in the continental U.S. A primary goal of the NAIP program is to enable availability of of ortho imagery within one year of acquisition. The source imagery used is 1 meter ground sample distance (GSD) ortho imagery rectified to a horizontal accuracy of within +/- 5 meters of reference digital ortho quarter quads (DOQQ's) from the National Digital Ortho Program (NDOP). NAIP quarter quads are formatted to the UTM coordinate system using NAD83. NAIP imagery may contain as much as 10% cloud cover per tile. Georeferenced Tagged Image File Format (GeoTIFFs) for NJ were acquired by the NJ Office of Information Technology and reprocessed to lossless JPEG2000 format. See Data Quality>Lineage for details. Please note that the WMS resamples the data, so the locations and characteristics of features shown by the service are not identical to the reprocessed image files. metadata

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Imagery: USDA 2006 Natural: Digital color infrared (CIR) orthophotography of New Jersey in State Plane NAD83 Coordinates, U.S. Survey Feet. The digital orthophotography was produced at a scale of 1:2400 (1"=200') with a 1 foot pixel resolution. Digital orthophotography combines the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. Digital orthophotography is a process which converts aerial photography from an original photo negative to a digital product that has been positionally corrected for camera lens distortion, vertical displacement and variations in aircraft altitude and orientation. Aerial photography of the entire State of New Jersey was captured during February-April, 2002. The ortho-rectification process achieved a +/-4.0 ft. horizontal accuracy at a 95% confidence level, National Standard for Spatial Data Accuracy (NSSDA). This dataset consists of 5000' x 5000' files in MrSID format with a 15:1 compresssion ratio. The files were produced utilizing MrSID Geospatial Edition 1.4 and are approximately 5 MB in size. metadata

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Impervious Surface % (2012): The Impervious Surface layer is taken from the Land Use 2012 data set. What is meant by impervious surface is material such as concrete and asphalt that comprise roadways, parking areas, sidewalks and buildings. As the land use/land cover of each polygon was mapped from 2012 aerial photography, a visual estimate was also made of the amount of impervious surface in each. This estimate was recorded as a percentage of the total polygon area, in 5% increments, which are depicted here. These percentages can be used to determine the total acreage of impervious surface in any area of interest.The 2012 LU/LC data set is the fifth in a series of land use mapping efforts that was begun in 1986. Revisions and additions to the initial baseline layer were done in subsequent years from imagery captured in 1995/97, 2002, 2007 and 2012. This present 2012 update was created by comparing the 2007 LU/LC layer from NJDEP's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to 2012 color infrared (CIR) imagery and delineating and coding areas of change. Work for this data set was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). LU/LC changes were captured by adding new line work and attribute data for the 2012 land use directly to the base data layer. All 2007 LU/LC polygons and attribute fields remain in this data set, so change analysis for the period 2007-2012 can be undertaken from this one layer. The classification system used was a modified Anderson et al., classification system. An impervious surface (IS) code was also assigned to each LU/LC polygon based on the percentage of impervious surface within each polygon as of 2007. Minimum mapping unit (MMU) is 1 acre. metadata

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Innovation Zones: The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) has created three Innovation Zones throughout the state that encompass state universities, research institutions and related businesses. The zones include areas within the cities of Camden, Newark and the Greater New Brunswick Area. Innovation Zones are a collaborative state effort involving the EDA, New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology and other state agencies. These technology neighborhoods are designed to spur collaborative efforts and encourage the rapid transfer of discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace. Enhanced financial incentives are available to eligible technology and life sciences businesses locating in these zones. Companies within the zones will benefit from enhanced partnership opportunities through the state, coordinated by the NJ Commission on Science and Technology. metadata

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Known Contaminated Sites List: The Known Contaminated Sites List for New Jersey 2005 are those sites and properties within the state where contamination of soil or ground water has been identified or where there has been, or there is suspected to have been, a discharge of contamination. This list of Known Contaminated Sites may include sites where remediation is either currently under way, required but not yet initiated or has been completed. The data included here dates from 2001. It is important to note that some of the cases listed may have been fully remediated and should no longer be listed as known contaminated sites. Additionally new contaminated sites have been identified since the creation of this list and are not included here. For further information contact NJDEP's Site Remediation Program and Waste Management (SRWM) lead program, which are identified with each site listed in this data base. Contact information for SRWMs lead program can acquired at www.state.nj.us/dep/srp. metadata

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Laboratories OQA Certified: This data shows the physical locations of commercial environmental New Jersey laboratories in the Office of Quality Assurance (OQA) Lab Certification Program. The physical locations were obtained from the NJDEP's NJ Environmental Management System (NJEMS) - Site Master File (SMF). The data consists of map coordinates, lab names and their lab numbers and will assist the Office of Quality Assurance (OQA) in scheduling on-site audits of these facilities. Please note that this data is routinely generated from the NJEMS-SMF database. metadata

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Landfill Parcel Groups over 35 acres (211): This data was generated to help promote solar installations that provide economic and environmental benefits. Landfills are well-suited for the development of large solar generation projects. Large-scale solar development can offset the costs to cap or remediate these sites and should be encouraged. Other innovative, large-scale solar installations are on the horizon and should be considered in addition to, not in lieu of, smaller-scale, grid-connected applications.This layer is created from a selection from the NJ statewide parcels data received from the counties. The feature class polygons were created through an aggregation of parcels identified as affiliated with an individual landfill site. The attribute data retained is from the parcel that most contains, or is contained in, the individual landfill site. metadata

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Landfills over 35 acres (108): This data was generated to help promote solar installations that provide economic and environmental benefits. Landfills are well-suited for the development of large solar generation projects. Large-scale solar development can offset the costs to cap or remediate these sites and should be encouraged. Other innovative, large-scale solar installations are on the horizon and should be considered in addition to, not in lieu of, smaller-scale, grid-connected applications.This data represents solid waste landfill sites in New Jersey that are on parcels or parcel groups approximately 35 acres or greater in size. The points delineated in this data were originally taken from original paper topoquads marked by field personnel, and location data developed by the Site Remediation Program. These delineations were later refined using site plans, tax parcel data and aerial photography by employees of the Solid and Hazardous Waste Program. metadata

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Land Use 2007: The 2007 LU/LC data set is the fourth in a series of land use mapping efforts that was begun in 1986. Revisions and additions to the initial baseline layer were done in subsequent years from imagery captured in 1995/97, 2002 and 2007. This present 2007 update was created by comparing the 2002 LU/LC layer from NJ DEP's Geographical Information Systems (GIS) database to 2007 color infrared (CIR) imagery and delineating and coding areas of change. Work for this data set was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). LU/LC changes were captured by adding new line work and attribute data for the 2007 land use directly to the base data layer. All 2002 LU/LC polygons and attribute fields remain in this data set, so change analysis for the period 2002-2007 can be undertaken from this one layer. The classification system used was a modified Anderson et al., classification system. An impervious surface (IS) code was also assigned to each LU/LC polygon based on the percentage of impervious surface within each polygon as of 2007. Minimum mapping unit (MMU) is 1 acre. ADVISORY:This metadata file contains information for the 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LU/LC) data sets, which were mapped by Watershed Management Area (WMA). There are additional reference documents listed in this file under Supplemental Information which should also be examined by users of these data sets.As stated in this metadata record's Use Constraints section, NJDEP makes no representations of any kind, including, but not limited to, the warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use, nor are any such warranties to be implied with respect to the digital data layers furnished hereunder. NJDEP assumes no responsibility to maintain them in any manner or form. By downloading this data, user agrees to the data use constraints listed within this metadata record. metadata

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Land Use 2012: This data represents a "generalized" version of the 2012 LULC. To improve the performance of the web applications displaying the 2012 land use data, it was necessary to create a new simplified layer that included only the minimum number of polygons and attributes needed to represent the 2012 land use conditions.The 2012 LU/LC data set is the fifth in a series of land use mapping efforts that was begun in 1986. Revisions and additions to the initial baseline layer were done in subsequent years from imagery captured in 1995/97, 2002, 2007 and 2012. This present 2012 update was created by comparing the 2007 LU/LC layer from NJDEP's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to 2012 color infrared (CIR) imagery and delineating and coding areas of change. Work for this data set was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). LU/LC changes were captured by adding new line work and attribute data for the 2012 land use directly to the base data layer. All 2007 LU/LC polygons and attribute fields remain in this data set, so change analysis for the period 2007-2012 can be undertaken from this one layer. The classification system used was a modified Anderson et al., classification system. An impervious surface (IS) code was also assigned to each LU/LC polygon based on the percentage of impervious surface within each polygon as of 2007. Minimum mapping unit (MMU) is 1 acre. metadata

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Land Use Change 2007-2012: Included in this layer are all areas of New Jersey which have undergone a change in land use or land cover between 2007 and 2012. These areas were identified by examining the Land Use 2007 layer over the 2012 aerial photography, and coding areas of change, as part of the 2012 Land Use/Land Cover Update Project. Both natural and man-induced changes are included. Each polygon, however, can be queried to determine the specific type of change it underwent. The 2012 LU/LC data set is the fifth in a series of land use mapping efforts that was begun in 1986. Revisions and additions to the initial baseline layer were done in subsequent years from imagery captured in 1995/97, 2002, 2007 and 2012. This present 2012 update was created by comparing the 2007 LU/LC layer from NJDEP's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to 2012 color infrared (CIR) imagery and delineating and coding areas of change. Work for this data set was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). LU/LC changes were captured by adding new line work and attribute data for the 2012 land use directly to the base data layer. All 2007 LU/LC polygons and attribute fields remain in this data set, so change analysis for the period 2007-2012 can be undertaken from this one layer. The classification system used was a modified Anderson et al., classification system. An impervious surface (IS) code was also assigned to each LU/LC polygon based on the percentage of impervious surface within each polygon as of 2007. Minimum mapping unit (MMU) is 1 acre. metadata

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Landscape Project - Freshwater Mussel: DEP maintains a Stream Network data layer that is a subset of the USGS 1:24,000 high-resolution National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). In Version 3.1 of the Landscape Project, stream and water body centerlines from the NHD Streams 2002 data layer are used to represent freshwater mussel habitat. Water body centerline and stream centerline data are valued exclusively by freshwater mussel species occurrence areas while other aquatic species habitats are represented with polygons from the Species-Based Habitat layer. In order to form representative 'patches' of habitat from the NHD Streams 2002 layer, centerlines were broken at the following points:
The confluence of two or more streams The inflow/outflow of a water body
Stretches of stream intersected by a mussel SOA are valued as habitat.
All valued streams are buffered by 0.75 kilometers upstream and downstream. The 0.75 kilometer distance is chosen as a conservative buffer estimate because scientific literature, which is based largely upon larval transport by host fishes, indicates that if there are two occurrences within two kilometers of each other (assuming unsuitable habitat between), these occurrences should be considered as part of the same local population (NatureServe 2011). In the cases where stream buffers of separate occurrences of the same species met, either upstream or downstream, the stream segments between those occurrences are also valued for that species. In addition, in cases where dams are barriers the extent of stream valued was limited. metadata

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Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Atlantic Coastal: The Landscape Project combines documented wildlife locations with NJDEP aerial photo-based 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) to delineate imperiled and special concern species habitat within New Jersey. Many species occurrence locations cannot be published because they may represent nest sites, roost sites, dens and other sites used by species that are vulnerable to human disturbance and, in some cases, susceptible to illegal collection. At the same time, wildlife moves, as individual animals use various habitat features within the landscape to fulfill their foraging, sheltering and breeding needs. Therefore, protecting individual occurrences or the area used by one individual is generally not sufficient to protect the local population. Landscape Project maps address these issues by displaying habitat patches that animals use and that are required to support local populations, rather than pinpointing exact locations of the most sensitive wildlife sites or simply protecting points where species happened to be observed at one point in time. Prior to combining species occurrence data with LULC data to form the habitat patches that make up the Species-Based Habitat layer, each dataset was generated according to a specific data development process. metadata

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Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Delaware Bay: The Landscape Project combines documented wildlife locations with NJDEP aerial photo-based 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) to delineate imperiled and special concern species habitat within New Jersey. Many species occurrence locations cannot be published because they may represent nest sites, roost sites, dens and other sites used by species that are vulnerable to human disturbance and, in some cases, susceptible to illegal collection. At the same time, wildlife moves, as individual animals use various habitat features within the landscape to fulfill their foraging, sheltering and breeding needs. Therefore, protecting individual occurrences or the area used by one individual is generally not sufficient to protect the local population. Landscape Project maps address these issues by displaying habitat patches that animals use and that are required to support local populations, rather than pinpointing exact locations of the most sensitive wildlife sites or simply protecting points where species happened to be observed at one point in time. Prior to combining species occurrence data with LULC data to form the habitat patches that make up the Species-Based Habitat layer, each dataset was generated according to a specific data development process. metadata

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Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Marine: The Landscape Project combines documented wildlife locations with NJDEP aerial photo-based 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) to delineate imperiled and special concern species habitat within New Jersey. Many species occurrence locations cannot be published because they may represent nest sites, roost sites, dens and other sites used by species that are vulnerable to human disturbance and, in some cases, susceptible to illegal collection. At the same time, wildlife moves, as individual animals use various habitat features within the landscape to fulfill their foraging, sheltering and breeding needs. Therefore, protecting individual occurrences or the area used by one individual is generally not sufficient to protect the local population. Landscape Project maps address these issues by displaying habitat patches that animals use and that are required to support local populations, rather than pinpointing exact locations of the most sensitive wildlife sites or simply protecting points where species happened to be observed at one point in time. Prior to combining species occurrence data with LULC data to form the habitat patches that make up the Species-Based Habitat layer, each dataset was generated according to a specific data development process. metadata

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Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Piedmont Plains: The Landscape Project combines documented wildlife locations with NJDEP aerial photo-based 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) to delineate imperiled and special concern species habitat within New Jersey. Many species occurrence locations cannot be published because they may represent nest sites, roost sites, dens and other sites used by species that are vulnerable to human disturbance and, in some cases, susceptible to illegal collection. At the same time, wildlife moves, as individual animals use various habitat features within the landscape to fulfill their foraging, sheltering and breeding needs. Therefore, protecting individual occurrences or the area used by one individual is generally not sufficient to protect the local population. Landscape Project maps address these issues by displaying habitat patches that animals use and that are required to support local populations, rather than pinpointing exact locations of the most sensitive wildlife sites or simply protecting points where species happened to be observed at one point in time. Prior to combining species occurrence data with LULC data to form the habitat patches that make up the Species-Based Habitat layer, each dataset was generated according to a specific data development process. metadata

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Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Pinelands: The Landscape Project combines documented wildlife locations with NJDEP aerial photo-based 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) to delineate imperiled and special concern species habitat within New Jersey. Many species occurrence locations cannot be published because they may represent nest sites, roost sites, dens and other sites used by species that are vulnerable to human disturbance and, in some cases, susceptible to illegal collection. At the same time, wildlife moves, as individual animals use various habitat features within the landscape to fulfill their foraging, sheltering and breeding needs. Therefore, protecting individual occurrences or the area used by one individual is generally not sufficient to protect the local population. Landscape Project maps address these issues by displaying habitat patches that animals use and that are required to support local populations, rather than pinpointing exact locations of the most sensitive wildlife sites or simply protecting points where species happened to be observed at one point in time. Prior to combining species occurrence data with LULC data to form the habitat patches that make up the Species-Based Habitat layer, each dataset was generated according to a specific data development process. metadata

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Landscape Project - Species-Based Habitat - Skylands: The Landscape Project combines documented wildlife locations with NJDEP aerial photo-based 2007 Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) to delineate imperiled and special concern species habitat within New Jersey. Many species occurrence locations cannot be published because they may represent nest sites, roost sites, dens and other sites used by species that are vulnerable to human disturbance and, in some cases, susceptible to illegal collection. At the same time, wildlife moves, as individual animals use various habitat features within the landscape to fulfill their foraging, sheltering and breeding needs. Therefore, protecting individual occurrences or the area used by one individual is generally not sufficient to protect the local population. Landscape Project maps address these issues by displaying habitat patches that animals use and that are required to support local populations, rather than pinpointing exact locations of the most sensitive wildlife sites or simply protecting points where species happened to be observed at one point in time. Prior to combining species occurrence data with LULC data to form the habitat patches that make up the Species-Based Habitat layer, each dataset was generated according to a specific data development process. metadata

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Landscape Project - Vernal Habitat: In 2001, ENSP partnered with Rutgers University Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA) to develop a method for mapping potential vernal pools throughout New Jersey. Through an on-screen visual interpretation of digital orthophotography, CRSSA identified over 13,000 potential pools throughout the state. A subset of these pools was field verified and confirmed, with an 88% accuracy rate, to meet the physical characteristics to qualify as a vernal pool (Lathrop et al. 2005). In accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:7A-1.4, the term 'vernal habitat' includes a vernal pool - or the area of ponding - plus any freshwater wetlands adjacent to the vernal pool. Vernal habitat areas mapped in the Landscape Project rely upon those data developed by the DEP and CRSSA to identify sites that should be field checked for possible identification as vernal habitats areas. DEP staff is in the process of field-verifying these pools. The Department also maps vernal habitat areas based upon on-the-ground assessment of sites not captured by the CRSSA mapping. The Landscape Project includes all of the CRSAA-identified sites, as well as sites identified by on-the-ground reconnaissance, categorized as either 'potential vernal habitat areas' or 'vernal habitat areas' as defined below: ' Potential vernal habitat area - These are areas identified by CRSSA as possibly containing a vernal pool that meets the criteria of a 'vernal habitat' pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:7A-1.4. These sites include sites that have been field inspected and have been found to meet the physical characteristics of a vernal habitat, but for which biological criteria have not yet been measured, as well as sites that have not been checked by DEP staff. ' Vernal habitat areas - These are areas that contain pools that have been field-verified by the Department and have been determined to meet both the physical and biological characteristics of a vernal habitat in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:7A-1.4. All areas mapped as 'potential vernal habitat areas' and 'vernal habitat areas' are derived from a point location estimated to be the center of an individual vernal pool and include all areas within 300 meters of the point. Note that the occurrence area is not intended to suggest or correspond with any specific regulatory requirement. Rather, the area added around the point accounts for variations in the size of individual vernal pools, variations in the width of freshwater wetlands adjacent to the pool, plus adjacent habitats sufficient to include the estimated home range for vernal pool obligate species. If there is an overlap between areas mapped around two or more nearby points, the boundaries are conjoined to generate contiguous patches. If the resulting patch contains areas mapped as 'vernal habitat area' and areas mapped as 'potential vernal habitat areas,' the entire patch is labeled as a 'vernal habitat area.' metadata

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Landscape Regions: New Jersey's dunes, beaches, tidal marshes, cedar swamps, vast pitch pine forests, extensive grasslands, peat bogs, maple-oak forests, ridgetops, brackish bays, rivers, streams and the Atlantic Ocean support an amazing array of wildlife. That is true despite the fact that much of its diverse landscape has been greatly altered by human enterprises such as agriculture and development that fragments and degrades wildlife habitat. Sustaining wildlife populations over time requires large healthy landscapes with broad expanses of natural habitat. Thus, the Landscape Project focuses on ecoregions or Landscape Regions where plant and animal communities are ecologically similar and closely interlinked. The delineation of the state into regions serves as a spatial framework for management and conservation of species and their habitats, and as a means to organize information so that it is meaningful and widely accessible to end-users. Geographic features and landforms (e.g., rivers, watershed boundaries, ridgelines, soils, vegetation, etc.) were used to delineate the general area of five Landscape Regions in New Jersey. Region boundaries were shifted to align with major roads (county level or larger) that serve as barriers to movement for many species. A sixth region, the Marine Region, is an exclusively aquatic region that includes the New Jersey portion of the Delaware and Raritan bays as well as the portion of the Atlantic Ocean along the coast of New Jersey. ENSP has identified and mapped habitat for endangered, threatened and special concern wildlife within each Landscape Region utilizing an extensive database that combines species occurrence information with land-use/land-cover classification data and species habitat requirements. The resulting Landscape maps provide an accurate, reliable and scientifically sound basis for habitat protection within each region. One of the Landscape Project's unique features is that it enables users to focus on the big picture, and not just on individual locations of imperiled and special concern species as those areas become threatened. Thus, within large landscapes, the Landscape Project identifies areas of endangered and threatened wildlife habitat that are important to the maintenance and recovery of New Jersey's endangered and threatened wildlife populations. metadata

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Landslides: Landslides in New Jersey contains point locations and other attributes for historic and recent landslide locations in New Jersey mapped by the New Jersey Geological Survey (NJGS). The landslides have occurred in the northern and central part of the state and include slumps, debris flows, rockfalls and rockslides. Although in New Jersey landslides are not as common as in other areas of the United States, they are a geologic hazard in areas with steep to moderate slopes or geologic units prone to failure. They cause damage to utilities, property, and transportation routes. The average annual direct and indirect cost of New Jersey landslides is likely in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. New Jersey landslides have also caused fatalities and injuries. metadata

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Legislative Districts: The Legislative district file (Legdis) was created to identify the legislative districts for New Jersey. This file was created using a 2000 State Municipality file (stmun) file for a basemap. Ledgis was created using the legislative districts shown by the New Jersey office of Legislative Services. Legdis was updated in March, 2006 to reflect changes in Redistricting and Representatives that may have occurred. All updating was done with ArcGIS software. metadata

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Magnetic Anomalies (gammas): Magnetic anomalies are produced by variations in the distribution of iron minerals, usually magnetite, in the rocks of the Earth's crust. Igneous and metamorphic rocks can be very magnetic. By comparison, sedimentary rocks are usually nonmagnetic. Magnetic anomalies therefore provide a way of mapping exposed and buried crystalline rocks. Magnetic Anomalies of New Jersey are contours (polygons) at 100 gamma intervals. The contours are based on magnetic data in New Jersey and vicinity. The aeromagnetic anomalies in New Jersey have lows ranging from -100 to -200 gammas highs ranging from 900 to 1000 gammas. metadata

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Major Roads: This data model was designed using portions of the ESRI UNETRANS data model, and incorporates existing data with more recent spatial and roadway inventory data. These data encompass the NJDOT statewide road network, as well as public roads that fall outside of the NJDOT's jurisdiction. Roads were originally digitized using 2002 New Jersey statewide orthophotos, which were produced at a scale of 1:2400 (1"=200') with a 1 foot pixel resolution. The orthophotos were captured during February-April 2002, and were ortho-rectified to a +/- 4.0 foot horizontal accuracy at a 95% confidence level. Roads were digitized to the visible center of a street, within a tolerance of +/- 3 feet and then attributed using data collected for the Maintenance Management Systems and Local Road Inventory projects (2002-2005), which are both NJDOT data collection projects. Only public roads were digitized and attributed. The project began in November 2003, and was completed by May 31, 2005. Data updated in 2006 using the methodology described above. *Modified by NJDEP - removed local roads and ramps. metadata

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Methane Emissions from Domestic Waste Water: The methane emissions are estimated using the methodology from the EPA Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2003. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 County Population. metadata

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Methane Emissions from Landfills: The methane emissions are estimated for each landfill considering total waste in place, landfill size, and location (arid or non-arid climate), and then aggregated to county level. Note: this dataset doesn't include all landfills in the United States due to gaps in either precise geographic location or waste in place. Source: EPA, Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP), April 2008. metadata

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Methane Emissions from Manure Management: The following animal types were included in this analysis: dairy cows, beef cows, hogs and pigs, sheep, chickens and layers, broilers, and turkey. The methane emissions were calculated by animal type and manure management system at a county level. Source: USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2002 data. metadata

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Metropolitan Transportation Planning Areas: This data is a graphical representation of Metropolitan Planning Organizations in New Jersey. A metropolitan planning organization (MPO) is a federally mandated and federally funded transportation policy-making organization in the United States that is made up of representatives from local government and governmental transportation authorities. metadata

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Mid-Atlantic States: This data is a graphical representation showing the state boundaries for New Jersey and its neighboring states. The data layer is a compilation of data layers from various state boundary sources. metadata

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MMS Lease Blocks Interpolated: This data set contains OCS block outlines in ESRI Arc/Info exportand Arc/View shape file formats for the MMS Atlantic Region. OCS blocksare used to define small geographic areas within an Official ProtractionDiagram (OPD) for leasing and administrative purposes. These blockshave been clipped along the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary and alonglines contained in the Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) GIS datafiles.Because GIS projection and topology functions can change orgeneralize coordinates, these GIS files are NOT an OFFICIAL record for the exact OCS block boundaries. Only the paper document or a digitalimage of it serve as OFFICIAL records metadata

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Municipalities: This data set is a spatial representation of municipalities in New Jersey developed by the New Jersey Office of Information Technology (OIT), Office of Geographic Information Systems (OGIS). It is not a survey document and should not be used as such. The polygons delineated in this data set do not represent legal boundaries.This data set improves upon previous versions of municipal boundaries through the integration of coincident features from several high quality source data sets, as a component of the OGIS statewide Parcels Normalization Project concluded in March 2010. metadata

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National Waterway Network: The National Waterway Network is a comprehensive network database of the nation's navigable waterways. The data set covers the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Alaska, Puerto Rico and water links between. The nominal scale of the dataset varies with the source material. The majority of the information is at 1:100,000 with larger scales used in harbor/bay/port areas and smaller scales used in open waters. metadata

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Natural Heritage Grid Map: Through its Natural Heritage Database, the Office of Natural Lands Management (ONLM) documents rare species and ecological community habitat to inform decision-makers who need to address the conservation of natural resources. The Natural Heritage Grid Map is a geographic information system (GIS) file that provides a general portrayal of the geographic locations of rare plant species and ecological communities for the entire state. It does not contain data for animal species. The Natural Heritage Grid Map was produced using computer-generated vector-based polygons that divide the boundary lines of each USGS 1:24,000 scale topographic map into 100 grid cells, each cell being between 358 and 372 acres in size. If a rare plant species or ecological community has been documented from anywhere within a cell, the entire cell will be coded as containing an occurrence of a rare plant species/ecological community. An associated data table can be linked or related to the NHPGRID table in order to display information about the individual rare plant species/ecological community occurrences within any cell. metadata

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Natural Heritage Priority Sites: The Natural Heritage Priority Sites Coverage was created to identify the best habitats for rare plant and animal species and natural communities through analysis of information in the NJ Natural Heritage Database. Natural Heritage Priority Sites contain some of the best and most viable occurrences of endangered and threatened species and natural communities, but they do not cover all known habitat for endangered and threatened species in New Jersey. If information is needed on whether or not endangered or threatened species have been documented from a particular piece of land, a Natural Heritage Database search can be requested by contacting the Office of Natural Lands Management. metadata

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Navigation Area Feature: NOAA's Electronic Navigational Charts (NOAA ENCs) have been developed to support the marine transportation infrastructure and coastal management. The NOAA ENCs are in S-57, a data standard developed by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) to be used for the exchange of digital hydrographic data. NOAA ENC?s can be used in Geographic Information Systems, (GIS) allowing for broader public access. Many GIS's, however cannot read an ENC's native S-57 format to address this problem. NOAA's ENC? Direct to GIS web portal provides comprehensive access to display, query, and download all available large scale NOAA ENC? data in a variety of GIS/CAD formats for non-navigational purposes using Internet mapping service technology. Nautical chart features contained within an NOAA ENC provide a detailed representation of the U.S. coastal and marine environment. This data includes coastal topography, bathymetry, landmarks, geographic place names and marine boundaries. Features in an NOAA ENC are limited in that they only represent the geographic region that is depicted in that particular NOAA ENC. By aggregating nautical features from all NOAA ENCs in the creation of GIS data, a contiguous depiction of the U.S coastal and marine environment is achieved. metadata

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New Jersey Call Area: The blocks shown in this layer indicate areas chosen by different wind farm developers for exploration and leasing. These are estimated areas, and may change in the future and are roughly depicted in the general locations shown. Blocks with name attributes are SPECIFIC locations, and should be distinguished between other projects (un-named blocks) where these areas overlap. metadata

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New Jersey Redevelopment Authority Eligible Municipalities (NJRA): These municipalities are eligible to access resources through the New Jersey Redevelopment Authority (NJRA). The NJRA was created legislatively, through the New Jersey Urban Redevelopment Act in July 1996. ( P.L. Chapter 62, pdf, 224 KB) The Act provides the State's urban centers with opportunities to create functional public/private partnerships, to leverage funds for entrepreneurial growth and job creation, and to enhance community empowerment. This Act is intended to provide a coordinated state response to revitalizing New Jersey's most distressed urban neighborhoods. metadata

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New Jersey State Park Service - Parks and Forests Trail System: This data set contains over 1,000 miles of official recreational trails on lands owned and managed by New Jersey State Park Service (NJSPS). Data collection was a cooperative effort between New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) employees, local volunteers, and non-profit agencies resulting in varying degrees of spatial accuracy and detail. Due to the varied mapping sources this data is not intended for orienteering purposes. metadata

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NJ WQDE Water Quality Monitoring: The Water Quality Data Exchange (WQDE) data maintains the locations of water quality monitoring stations from NJDEP's COMPASS database. A station is a location at which a data collection event takes place, such a collection of a field sample, measurement of field parameters or evaluation of environmental habitats. metadata

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NJEMS Sites: NJEMS Sites are points representing sites regulated by NJDEP under one or more regulatory permitting or enforcement programs, or sites that are otherwise of some interest to a NJDEP program. The NJDEP New Jersey Environmental Management System (NJEMS) serves as the database that supplies coordinates and descriptive attributes from several tables used to generate this GIS layer. This layer is produced primarily for the NJDEP i-MapNJ ArcIMS interactive mapping web application and ArcGIS (ArcView, ArcInfo) users.

Program interests included in NJEMS are: Air, Communications Center, Discharge Prevention, Exams and Licensing, Fish Game and Wildlife, Green Acres, Hazardous Waste, Lab Certification, Land Use, Landscape Irrigation, Parks and Forestry, Pesticides, Pinelands, Planning, Radiation, Right-to-Know, Site Remediation, Soil Conservation, Solid Waste, TCPA, Water Quality, Water Supply, and Watershed Management. The locations derived using GPS represent main entrance or front door locations for the sites. Users should note that not every site in NJEMS presently (as of September 2004) has an established coordinate (GPS or otherwise). NJDEP is continually working to acquire these with GPS, location data submitted to permitting programs, and through address matching techniques. metadata

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NJPDES Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO): This is a geographical representation of the locations of CSO outfall points statewide. Combined Sewer Overflows (CSO) are sewers that are designed to collect rainwater runoff, domestic sewage, and industrial wastewater in the same pipe. Most of the time, combined sewer systems transport all of their wastewater to a sewage treatment plant, where it is treated and then discharged to a water body. During periods of heavy rainfall or snowmelt, however, the wastewater volume in a combined sewer system can exceed the capacity of the sewer collection system or treatment plant.This map data layer provides information regarding the location of permitted CSO Outfall Points, the applicable NJPDES Permit number, the assigned 3-digit discharge serial number, the latitude and longitude, the alternate name (such as a street address) of the CSO point, the municipality and Watershed Management Area (WMA) where the CSO outfall is located, a unique identifier for each point consisting of the permit number and outfall number, the receiving waterbody, the receiving treatment plant name and permit number, if the CSO outfall has solids and floatable treatment, a link for Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) data, and a website. metadata

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NJPDES Discharge Points-Surface Water: This point layer represents the New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) surface water discharge locations compiled from GPSed locations, NJPDES databases, and permit applications. This layer contains the surface water discharge locations for the active as well as terminated discharges. metadata

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NJPDES Non-point Source Regulated Facilities: The NJPDES layer shows approximate locations of permitted facilities within the Barnegat Bay Watershed Management Area, regulated by New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Nonpoint Pollution Control (BNPC). Permits vary based on discharge type and activity governed by N.J.A.C. 7:14A. This layer includes seven different discharge types, which the Department regulates. metadata

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NJPDES Regulated Facilities: The NJPDES layer shows approximate locations of permitted facilities regulated by New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Nonpoint Pollution Control (BNPC). Permits vary based on discharge type and activity governed by N.J.A.C. 7:14A. This layer includes seven different discharge types, which the Department regulates. It includes facilities regulated for having a discharge of sanitary sewage to the ground with a design volume in excess of 2,000 gallons per day (GPD), but which were constructed prior to January 1, 1990 and approved by local Health Departments. It includes concrete product manufactures that have stormwater discharges to surface waters. These facilities manufacture concrete products, concrete block and brick, and ready mixed concrete or are facilities classified as concrete manufacturers by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). It includes permitted facilities for having sanitary wastewater and industrial wastewater discharges though various methods such as lagoons, spray irrigation, or overland flow. It includes industrial wastewater facilities, such as cooling water, process wastewater, and boiler blowdown and facilities with subsurface disposal system(s) that discharges greater than 2,000 GPD to septic systems, subsurface trench systems, dry wells, or seepage pits. It includes facilities that engage in the activity of manufacturing hot mix asphalt and that discharge stormwater to either the surface or ground water sources. It includes facilities that cannot eliminate exposure of pollutants to stormwater and it includes facilities involved in the recycling of materials including metal scrap yards, battery reclaimers, salvage yards, and automobile junkyards. NJPDES permits are issued by the NJDEP and are authorized according to a specific set of rules governing discharges within the state of New Jersey. metadata

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Open Space (County): This data set contains protected New Jersey open space and recreation areas that are either owned in fee simple interest by a county or are managed by a county but owned in fee by another governmental agency or nonprofit. These open space lands have either received funding through the Green Acres Local Assistance Program or are listed on a Green Acres approved Recreation and Open Space Inventory (ROSI). Types of open space property in this data layer include parks, conservation areas, preserves, historic sites, recreational fields, beaches, etc. This data set provides users with a manageable graphic inventory of county protected open space throughout New Jersey. It serves as a valuable tool in land acquisition decisions and is NOT to be used for describing actual or true property ownership title. metadata

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Open Space (State): Depicted are areas owned by the State of New Jersey, and dedicated as preserved open space. Included would be State Parks, State Forests, Wildlife Management Areas, Natural Areas, and Recreation Areas, among others. This layer includes the major preserved open spaces in New Jersey, although additional dedicated open spaces have been set aside by counties, municipalities, and non-profit environmental groups throughout the state. metadata

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Open Space Barnegat Bay (County, Municipal and Nonprofit): This data set contains county, municipal and nonprofit owned protected New Jersey open space and recreation areas in fee simple interest in the Barnegat Bay Watershed. In some cases, protected lands extend beyond the Barnegat Bay Watershed. These boundaries are included to preserve the integrity of the tract. These open space lands have either received funding through the Green Acres Local Assistance Program or are listed on a Green Acres approved Recreation and Open Space Inventory (ROSI). Uses for the open space in this data layer include parks, conservation areas, preserves, historic sites, recreational fields, beaches, etc. The data was derived from a variety of mapped sources which vary in scale and level of accuracy. These sources are inclusive of but not exclusive of tax maps, surveys, deeds, digital aerial photography, orthophoto quad maps, quarter quadrangle maps as well as USGS topographic maps. Due to the variety of these mapped sources as well as the methods of data capture which is described in Process Step 1, this data set is limited in its ability to portray all open space lands accurately, particularly the parcels purchased prior to 1995. metadata

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Open Space Barnegat Bay (State): This data set contains protected open space and recreation areas owned in fee simple interest by the State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) in the Barnegat Bay Watershed. Types of property in this data layer include parcels such as parks, forests, historic sites, natural areas and wildlife management areas. In some cases, protected lands extend beyond the Barnegat Bay Watershed. These boundaries are included to preserve the integrity of the tract. The data was derived from a variety of source maps including tax maps, surveys and even hand-drafted boundary lines on USGS topographic maps. These source materials vary in scale and level of accuracy. Due to the varied mapped sources and methods of data capture, this data set is limited in its ability to portray all open space lands accurately, particularly the parcels purchased prior to 1991. metadata

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Parcels: This Oracle/ArcSDE view (persistent query), called OGIS.PARCEL_MOD4VAL_V, joins all of the records in the statewide edgematched tax parcel layer with attributes from the MOD-IV real estate tax record system for the State of New Jersey. MOD-IV data is joined only for parcel records with a unique Parcel Identification Number.The statewide parcel layer, parcels_nj, includes records covering 19 of the 21 counties in their entirety, plus Newark from Essex County and several municipalities from Middlesex County (East Brunswick, New Brunswick, North Brunswick, Piscataway, South Brunswick and Woodbridge.)Due to irregularities in the data development process, duplicate PIN values exist for different parcel records in parcels_nj. MOD-IV data has not been joined for these parcel records. There also are some parcel records with unique PIN for which there is no corresponding record in the MOD-IV extract used for this view.In addition, county and municipality names are included via join from municipal boundary data, for parcel records with a valid municipal code.For details about the data development process for the parcel layer, please refer to the metadata for parcels_nj.
Please note that these parcel data sets are not intended for use as tax maps. They are intended to provide reasonable representations of parcel boundaries for planning and other purposes. metadata

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Physiographic Provinces: New Jersey is divided into the Valley and Ridge, Highlands, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain Physiographic Provinces. Each province defines a region in which relief, landforms, and geology are significantly different from that of the adjoining and nearby regions. The boundary between each province is determined by a major change in topography and geology, and this data set delineates the boundary lines between them. metadata

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Pinelands Boundary: The boundary depicted in this layer is that adopted by the New Jersey State Legislature in accordance with the Pinelands Protection Act of 1979. It defines the areas under state regulation as outlined in the Comprehensive Management Plan developed as part of the act. A New Jersey Pinelands Commission was also created as part of the act to oversee the management of the Pinelands Protection Area. For more information on the regulations, the comprehensive management plan, and the commission, go to http://www.state.nj.us/pinelands. metadata

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Pinelands Management Area: The data is made up of polygons representing the Pinelands Management Area Boundaries in Southern New Jersey. Created manually by interpreting a textual document which described the boundary lines and drafting this information onto mylar using USGS photo quads as a base. In 1994 the data was digitzed and converted to New Jersey State Plane NAD 83 Feet. The current geometry is not static and is prone to change. metadata

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Place Names: This point layer was extracted from a data set produced by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), as part of its topographic map data base. Topographic maps, known as topoquads, are USGS maps that show a wide variety of information including generalized land use, roads and railroads, streams, political boundaries and the locations of many kinds of named features, among other things. For this application, a subset of two types of USGS point features, Places and Locales, were selected for display. Since many of these named locations are locally familiar names, they can serve to orient the user to the map display. For more information of the USGS data set, go to http://geonames.usgs.gov/. metadata

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Primary Mill Residues: Primary mill residues include wood materials (coarse and fine) and bark generated at manufacturing plants (primary wood-using mills) when round wood products are processed into primary wood products, such as slabs, edgings, trimmings, sawdust, veneer clippings and cores, and pulp screenings. Source: USDA, Forest Service's Timber Product Output database, 2007. metadata

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Purveyor:This is a graphical representation of the 1998 Public Community Water Purveyor Service Areas. Water purveyors are regulated by the NJDEP Bureau of Safe Drinking Water, under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Public Community Water Purveyors are systems that pipe water for human consumption to at least 15 service connections used year-round, or one that regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents. Public purveyors can be government agencies, private companies, or quasi-government groups. The boundaries mapped are those of the actual water delivery or service area. Franchise areas are not depicted (areas with legal rights for future service once developed). Water sources (wells or surface water intakes) are often located outside the delivery area boundaries. Water source information can be found in other NJDEP GIS files. metadata

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Quarries: This data contains point locations of selected sand, gravel and rock surficial mining operations in New Jersey. The database contains 1,009 inventoried operations with 186 being registered with the New Jersey Department of Labor, Office of Mine Safety and Compliance, and 823 inactive and abandoned surficial mining operations. One hundred sixty three of the registered mining operations were located using the Global Positioning System (GPS). With annual production of up to 20 million tons valued at $100 million, sand, gravel and rock mining is a significant industry in New Jersey. Inactive and abandoned operations are included because of their importance in environmental investigations, planning, zoning and resource evaluation. metadata

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Quad Grid: This data was produced to provide a graphic representation of information that depicts the statewide grid of quadrangle boundaries of New Jersey. metadata

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Quarter Quad Grid: Quarter quad Grid are a relatively new map tile unit developed by the USGS. A quarterquad represents 1/4 of a standard USGS topoquad, which is a map tile that has been in use for several years. The grid shown here represents the boundaries of all of the 635 individual quarterquad tiles that cover New Jersey. These boundaries match the boundaries of the 1995/97 Digital Images. The images and the individual quarterquad templates use the same name and numbering system. metadata

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Railroad Lines (Passenger): Line data delineating right-of-way centerlines for rail, light rail, and subway service lines operated by New Jersey Transit and connecting commuter lines. Data set is in shapefile format (ESRI). Most of the lines were heads-up digitized from New Jersey 2007 High Resolution Orthophotography, which has a 1 foot pixel size and tested accuracy of +/- 4 feet. Some of the lines were derived from other sources. metadata

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Railroad Stations (Passenger): Passenger rail station points on rail, light rail, and subway service lines operated by New Jersey Transit and connecting commuter lines. The data set is in point shape file format (ESRI). Points were digitized from New Jersey 2007 High Resolution Orthophotography (NAD83 NJ State Plane Feet), which has an accuracy of +/-4 feet NSSDA, and a pixel size of 1 foot. metadata

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Roads NJ (Centerlines): This data set represents all roadways, streets, and major highways within the State of New Jersey in a digital, vector based geographic database format. The New Jersey Office of Information Technology (OIT), Office of GIS (OGIS) has enhanced the previously published NJ Department of Transportation (DOT) Roadway Network GIS data set to create a fully segmented Road Centerlines of New Jersey feature class. This data set includes fully parsed address information and additional roadway characteristics. metadata

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Schools: This feature class and shapefile consist of point locations of schools in New Jersey. School records were derived from the public school, non-public school, and district tables published by the New Jersey Department of Education; the records were address-matched and in most cases checked against orthophotography.Most of the records were processed in 2003. For public schools, approximately 100 additional records were processed in 2007, and 38 in 2008. The public school data set includes records that appeared in the 2003 or 2007 data set but not in the 2008 table, and are presumed to be closed schools (see CLOSED attribute). Attribute and spatial location corrections were made in 2009 to selected records (see process steps). The non-public school data have not been updated since the original data set was processed; updates are planned, to be based on the latest tabular data from NJDOE.Charter schools were processed in early 2009 from current NJDOE tabular data. metadata

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Secondary Mill Residues: Secondary mill residues include wood scraps and sawdust from woodworking shops, furniture factories, wood container and pallet mills, and wholesale lumberyards. Data on the number of businesses by county was gathered from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2009 County Business Patterns. metadata

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Sewer Service Areas: This is a graphical representation of the States Sewer Service Area (SSA) mapping. The SSA mapping shows the planned method of wastewater disposal for specific areas, i.e. whether the wastewater will be collected to a regional treatment facility or treated on site and disposed of through a Surface Water (SW) discharge or a groundwater (GW) discharge. Areas not specifically mapped represent either water features where no construction will occur or land areas that default to individual subsurface disposal systems discharging less than 2,000 gallons/day (gpd) where the site conditions and existing regulations allow. This mapping, in conjunction with the text of the associated Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP), is used to make consistency determinations under the Water Quality Management (WQM) Planning rules, N.J.A.C. 7:15. The SSA mapping is prepared under the Water Quality Management (WQM) Planning rules, N.J.A.C. 7:15 in conjunction with the Statewide WQM Plan, which together constitute the Continuing Planning Process conducted pursuant to the Water Quality Planning Act, N.J.S.A. 58:11A-1 et seq., the Water Pollution Control Act, N.J.S.A. 58:10A-1 et seq., and N.J.S.A. 13:1D-1 et seq., and as required by Sections 303(e) and 208 of the Federal Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.). The version was signed into adoption on October 11, 2006 and appeared in the NJ register on November 6, 2006 NJ. metadata

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Shellfish Classification: This data is a graphic representation of NJ coastal waters classified according to regulations of shellfish harvest. Waters are classified in one of five categories: Prohibited - harvest not allowed under any conditions. Special Restricted - harvest allowed with a special permit requiring further purification of the shellfish before sale. Seasonal (Nov - Apr) - and Seasonal (Jan - Apr) - where harvest is permitted only during certain seasons of the year. The final category is Approved - harvest permitted under any conditions. Classification of the waters is based on the National Shellfish Sanitation Program. As specified in this program, classifications are based on three components: 1) Regular monitoring of water quality 2) Field surveys of shoreline conditions 3) Study of water currents and flows (hydrography). These functions are performed by New Jersey's Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring which monitors about 2,500 locations a minimum of five times a year. metadata

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Soils (SSURGO): The soil data shown in this layer represent the most recent information available from the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA has been re-mapping the county soil maps throughout the United States under the Soil Survey Geographic Database program (SSURGO). The intent of the program is to create new digital soils maps for each county, which are spatially accurate and fully attributed. To date, the USDA has completed and distributed new soil layers for 19 New Jersey counties, with only Hudson and Warren Counties not available. There will be no data set created for Hudson County, since there was no original soil survey created for it. The soil layer for Warren County is presently still under development. When completed, the Warren County data will be added to this statewide SSURGO layer.

As part of the SSURGO mapping program, complete soil attribute information for each county has also been put into digital format. Only a small amount of this attribute information can be included in this application. If more soil information is required, users can download a Microsoft Access database for each county from the official USDA SSURGO site, (http://soildatamart.nrcs.usda.gov/). The digital soil layers for each county are also available from this site in several different formats and projections, although layers in New Jersey State Plane Feet are not provided. However, the NJDEP has projected all of the available counties to NJSPF, and posted the projected layers on the NJDEP website (http://www.state.nj.us/dep/gis/soilsshp.html). metadata

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Solar Siting Analysis: Created specifically for utilization in solar siting analysis, the Land_lu_2007_gen layer is joined to the Land_lu_Solar_Siting_Category table using the LU07 field to create the Solar Siting Analysis.lyr It is symbolized using the Sol_SitCat field in the join table.The 2007 LU/LC data set is the fourth in a series of land use mapping efforts that was begun in 1986. Revisions and additions to the initial baseline layer were done in subsequent years from imagery captured in 1995/97, 2002 and 2007. This present 2007 update was created by comparing the 2002 LU/LC layer from NJ DEP's Geographical Information Systems (GIS) database to 2007 color infrared (CIR) imagery and delineating and coding areas of change. Work for this data set was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). LU/LC changes were captured by adding new line work and attribute data for the 2007 land use directly to the base data layer. All 2002 LU/LC polygons and attribute fields remain in this data set, so change analysis for the period 2002-2007 can be undertaken from this one layer. metadata

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Sole-Source Aquifers: There are seven sole-source aquifers (SSAs) in New Jersey. These are defined by the EPA as those aquifers that contribute more than 50% of the drinking water to a specific area and the water would be impossible to replace if the aquifer were contaminated. Sole-source aquifers are defined with guidelines set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as authorized in section 1424(e) of the Safe Drinking Water act of 1974. Any federally-funded project in an area that could affect ground-water in a sole-source aquifer must be reviewed by the US EPA. This 'project review area' includes the aquifer's 'recharge zone' and it's 'stream-flow source zone'. The recharge zone is the area through which water recharges the aquifer. The source zone is the upstream area that contributes recharge water to the aquifer. The EPA sometimes modifies the project review areas as published in the Federal Register in order to better protect zone as originally published. Most of New Jersey is covered by the seven SSAs and their project review areas. The order of chronological approval is as follows: 1.) Buried Valley SSA 2.) Ridgewood SSA 3.) Rockaway SSA 4.) Highlands SSA 5.) Northwest New Jersey SSA 6.) Coastal Plain SSA 7.) Ramapo SSA The sole source aquifer program is a federal program administered by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Safe Drinking Water Act. All questions about the program should be addressed to them. EPA's reference for the sole source aquifers in New Jersey is at: http://www.epa.gov/region2/water/aquifer/ metadata

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Sport Ocean Fishing Grounds: Prime fishing areas have a demonstrable history of supporting a significant local quantity of recreational and commercial fishing activity. The Department first mapped prime fishing areas in the 1980s. Since the map is over 20 years old, it was determined in 2003 that an update was needed. Charter boat, party boat and private boat captains were surveyed to identify the areas they consider recreationally significant fishing areas or prime fishing areas. This information was then compiled and refined into a digital format. metadata

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SRP - Preferred ID: The Site Remediation Program (SRP) - Preferred ID points represent active sites within SRP. These sites include all sites that are regulated under the Site Remediation Reform Act (SRRA), N.J.S.A. 58:10C-1 et seq. The NJDEP New Jersey Environmental Management System (NJEMS) serves as the database that supplies the coordinates and descriptive attributes from several tables used to generate this GIS layer. This layer is produced primarily for the NJDEP's online interactive mapping web applications and ArcGIS (ArcView, ArcInfo) users. The original location for the SRP Preferred ID is copied from the NJEMS (Masterfile) location. SRP may establish a different point to better reflect the SRP area of concern at the site. Users should note that not every SRP preferred ID in NJEMS has an established coordinate (GPS or otherwise). NJDEP is continually working to acquire these with GPS, location data submitted to permitting programs, and through address matching techniques.
For additional information about the SRP's Remedial Priority Scoring System Click here
metadata

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State Plan Centers: This data layer was generated as part of the New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan. Mapped are the boundaries of several categories of urban centers that are identified as part of the state plan. Centers are defined as areas with compact development, as opposed to areas that have less compacted, sprawl development. Since centers have existing infrastructure, new development or redevelopment should be directed to these areas. There are five types of centers in the state plan: Urban Centers, Regional Centers, Towns, Villages and Hamlets. Both already designated and planned centers are included. For more information on the Centers and the state plan go to http://www.nj.gov/dca/osg/. metadata

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State Planning Areas: Depicted is the State Plan Policy Map of the New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan. This plan establishes the groundwork for an integrated, statewide approach to future land use planning. The ultimate goal of the plan is to insure that both sustainable growth and natural resource protection are part of New Jersey's future. To guide the development strategies, the Office of State Planning has created the policy map to identify and locate the different types of areas that the state plan utilizes. Over twenty detailed area types are included in the policy map. These area designations, in conjunction with additional data layers, such as the State Planning Centers layer also included in this application, will be used to guide planning policy decisions throughout the state. For more information of the New Jersey State Plan, go to http://www.nj.gov/dca/osg/. metadata

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Streams: This layer depicts rivers, streams, canals, and other drainage features of the state. It was originally developed by the USGS for the topoquad mapping program. Both this layer, and a companion layer, Water Bodies, will be updated in the future to reflect more current conditions of the state's water features. metadata

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Sub-Watersheds (HUC14): The watersheds shown in this layer are the smallest watersheds mapped by the NJDEP and the USGS, with each covering only approximately 3,000 acres. The USGS calls the watersheds Hydrologic Units. Each basic unit is a unique feature, and is given a unique Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC), which is 14 digits long. The HUC is hierarchical. Larger and larger watersheds can be defined using different portions of the 14 digit code to define the watershed boundaries. These HUC14 watersheds form the basis for the other watershed layers.metadata

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Surface Water Quality Classification: This data is a digital representation of New Jersey's Surface Water Quality Standards in accordance with "Surface Water Quality Standards for New Jersey Waters" as designated in N.J.A.C. 7:9 B. The Surface Water Quality Standards (SWQS) establish the designated uses to be achieved and specify the water quality (criteria) necessary to protect the State's waters. Designated uses include potable water, propagation of fish and wildlife, recreation, agricultural and industrial supplies, and navigation. These are reflected in use classifications assigned to specific waters. The line-work has been broken/altered to reflect the descriptions specified at N.J.A.C. 7:9B-1.15. When interpreting the stream classifications and anti-degradation designations, the descriptions specified in the SWQS at N.J.A.C. 7:9B-1.15 always take precedence. The GIS layer reflects the stream classifications and anti-degradation designations adopted as of October 16, 2006 is supplemental only and is not legally binding. metadata

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Surficial Aquifers: The Surficial Aquifers of New Jersey consists of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) coverage (shapefile) of surficial aquifers and confining units in New Jersey. The surfical aquifer coverage includes glacial sediment exceeding 50 ft. thickness in northern New Jersey, and surficial sediment thicker than 50 ft. overlying Coastal Plain aquifers and confining units. The coverage is generalized to the 1:250,000 scale by eliminating polygons with less than 1,000,000 sq. ft. area (about 23 acres). The data were digitized from various published and unpublished 1:24,000, 1:100,000,and 1:250,000 scale geologic maps compiled from 1987 to 1993. metadata

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Surficial Geology: The Surficial Geology of New Jersey shows the extent of surficial geologic materials in New Jersey. Surficial materials are the unconsolidated glacial, river, wetland, windblown, marine, estuarine, and hillslope sediments and weathered rock materials that overlie bedrock and Coastal Plain formations and that are the parent material for agronomic soils. metadata

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Surficial Geology Cross-sections: The Surficial Geology Cross Section Lines are cross sections that show the extent, thickness, and layering of surficial materials in the subsurface along the line of section. metadata

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Sustainable Jersey Certified Municipalities: Sustainable Jersey Certified Municipalities is a certification program for municipalities in New Jersey that want to go green, save money, and take steps to sustain their quality of life over the long term. The Bronze Level of certification requires the establishment of a Green Team, implementation of 2 out of 7 PRIORITY ACTIONS, and a total of 150 points. Actions must be completed in 6 of the 16 categories. The Silver Level of Certification requires the establishment of a Green Team, implementation of 3 out of 7 PRIORITY ACTIONS, and a total of 350 points. Actions must be completed in 8 of the 16 categories. http://www.sustainablejersey.com/ metadata

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TMDL (Streamsheds): The pollutants of concern for these Stream TMDLs are fecal coliform and total phosphorus. Concentrations of these pollutants were found to exceed New Jersey's Surface Water Quality Standards (SWQS), published at N.J.A.C. 7-9B et seq., for the segments identified in the Reports. In accordance with Section 305(b) of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA), the State of New Jersey developed the 2002, 2004 and 2006 Integrated List of Waterbodies, addressing the overall water quality of the State's waters and identifying impaired waterbodies for which Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) may be necessary. As reported in the 2002, 2004 and 2006 Integrated List of Waterbodies, also identified is the river miles and management response associated with each listed segment. Nonpoint and stormwater point sources are the primary contributors to loads in these streams and can include storm-driven loads transporting fecal coliform form sources such as geese, farms, and domestic pets to the receiving water. Nonpoint sources also include steady-inputs from sources such as failing sewage conveyance systems and failing or inappropriately located septic systems. In some instances, point sources such as publicly-owned treatment works can contribute to phosphorus loads, and therefore will have further restrictions on effluent limits. The TMDLs are derived from waste load allocations from point sources plus load allocations from non-point sources and a margin of safety to account for uncertainty in the model. metadata

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TMDL (Streamsheds) Pre-2008: The pollutants of concern for these Stream TMDLs are fecal coliform and total phosphorus. Concentrations of these pollutants were found to exceed New Jersey's Surface Water Quality Standards (SWQS), published at N.J.A.C. 7-9B et seq., for the segments identified in the Reports. In accordance with Section 305(b) of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA), the State of New Jersey developed the 2002, 2004 and 2006 Integrated List of Waterbodies, addressing the overall water quality of the State's waters and identifying impaired waterbodies for which Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) may be necessary. As reported in the 2002, 2004 and 2006 Integrated List of Waterbodies, also identified is the river miles and management response associated with each listed segment. Nonpoint and stormwater point sources are the primary contributors to loads in these streams and can include storm-driven loads transporting fecal coliform form sources such as geese, farms, and domestic pets to the receiving water. Nonpoint sources also include steady-inputs from sources such as failing sewage conveyance systems and failing or inappropriately located septic systems. In some instances, point sources such as publicly-owned treatment works can contribute to phosphorus loads, and therefore will have further restrictions on effluent limits. The TMDLs are derived from waste load allocations from point sources plus load allocations from non-point sources and a margin of safety to account for uncertainty in the model. metadata

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TMDL (Lakesheds): The pollutants of concern for these Stream TMDLs are fecal coliform and total phosphorus. Concentrations of these pollutants were found to exceed New Jersey's Surface Water Quality Standards (SWQS), published at N.J.A.C. 7-9B et seq., for the segments identified in the Reports. In accordance with Section 305(b) of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA), the State of New Jersey developed the 2002, 2004 and 2006 Integrated List of Waterbodies, addressing the overall water quality of the State's waters and identifying impaired waterbodies for which Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) may be necessary. As reported in the 2002, 2004 and 2006 Integrated List of Waterbodies, also identified is the river miles and management response associated with each listed segment. Nonpoint and stormwater point sources are the primary contributors to loads in these streams and can include storm-driven loads transporting fecal coliform form sources such as geese, farms, and domestic pets to the receiving water. Nonpoint sources also include steady-inputs from sources such as failing sewage conveyance systems and failing or inappropriately located septic systems. In some instances, point sources such as publicly-owned treatment works can contribute to phosphorus loads, and therefore will have further restrictions on effluent limits. The TMDLs are derived from waste load allocations from point sources plus load allocations from non-point sources and a margin of safety to account for uncertainty in the model. metadata

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TMDL (Shellfish): The pollutant of concern for these shellfish TMDLs is total coliform. Nonpoint and stormwater point sources are the primary sources of total coliform/fecal coliform loads in these waterbodies. Source loads were estimated for land uses in each watershed and for local marinas that may be causing water quality impacts in these waterbodies. TMDLs were developed based on an analysis of the existing pathogen indicator data compared to NSSP and NJDEP pathogen indicator criteria, and the loading capacity has been allocated among the point and nonpoint sources. The TMDL reports include implementation strategies that will bring the subject waterbodies into compliance with the NSSP criteria for unrestricted shellfish harvest. metadata

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Tidal Benchmark Network: New Jersey Tidal Benchmark Network consists of point locations and other attributes for 215 stations. Some point locations are representative of groupings of tidal benchmarks in a small area. In these cases a central location was used to show these several benchmarks. The New Jersey Tidal Benchmark Network consists of 1200 tidal benchmarks along the coast to measure effects of sea level and shore changes and settle riparian rights disputes. All locations except one in the layer file are hyperlinked to njtidalbm.pdf with their Tidal Datums and Benchmark Elevation Sheet to provide additional information about the benchmarks. metadata

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Tidelands: The Tidelands claims line depicts areas now or formerly flowed at or below mean high tide. Since the mean high water line may change because of rises in sea level, the line does not represent the current mean high water line. Rather it depicts the mean high water line at the time of mapping and the historic mean high water line predating artificial alterations. The Tidelands claim line was originally mapped and promulgated on 1628 individual maps produced at a scale of 1:2400. The individual maps were subsequently merged together to produce the tidelands region shapefiles presented here. These region files were created to be used only as resource data sets to more easily identify those areas claimed under the tidelands program. They are not to be considered the official tidelands claim lines. Only the actual promulgated tidelands maps, at the production scale of 1:2400, can be used to locate the legally valid tidelands riparian claim line. For questions concerning possible tidelands claims, contact the Bureau of Tidelands as indicated in the full metadata record. metadata

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Tidelands Grid: This data is a graphical representation of riparian tidelands grid for New Jersey's Atlantic Coast. It was automated at a scale of 1:24,000. Coverage was partially attributed by IEP and the BGIA and Tidelands completed the coding and checked the codes. metadata

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Topographic Images (Color 24k): This Web Map Service (WMS) layer serves a seamless copy of Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps.Original DRG'S supplied by the USGS were reprocessed by removing the collar information and reprojecting into NAD83 NJ State Plane Feet.Each raster entity or pixel contains a color index from 0 through 12 referencing a color palette of RGB values from 0 through 255 in which the standard colors used in the DRG are defined. metadata

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Topographic Images (BW 24K): This Web Map Service (WMS) layer serves a seamless copy of monochromatic topographic base map (1:24,000 scale) raster graphic images. Data in the WMS were derived from 7.5 minute images published by the NJ Geological Survey in NAD83 NJ State Plane feet coordinates. NJGS derived those images from Digital Raster Graphic files of 7.5 minute quadrangles, published by the US Geological Survey. Source images are 12-color, 250 DPI. Source map dates are 1954 - 1994. metadata

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Topographic Images (100K): This Web Map Service (WMS) layer serves a seamless copy of color topographic base map (1:100,000 scale) raster graphic images. Data in the WMS were derived from county-wide images published by the NJ Geological Survey in NAD83 NJ State Plane feet coordinates. NJGS derived those images from Digital Raster Graphic files of 60 minute by 30 minute quadrangles, published by the US Geological Survey. Source images are 12-color, 250 DPI. Source map dates are 1982 - 1986. metadata

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Transit Village Buffer: Transit Village approximate boundaries, representing a half-mile radius around each transit village center point based on rail or bus station location. Transit Villages are designated by the program in the NJ Dept. of Transportation. metadata

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Transit Village Centers: Centerpoints of the 26 designated Transit Village Intiative (TVI) stations in New Jersey. There are 25 rail and light rail, one bus.The centerpoints were determined by several different methods, and are approximations. See full metadata for details. metadata

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Tug Barge Transit Route: Tug barge routes. metadata

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Underground Storage Tanks Facilities: UST Facilities are points representing NJEMS sites with Underground Storage Tanks regulated by NJDEP. This information represents UST facilities that are regulated under N.J.A.C. 7:14B. The layer includes UST registration and inspection information. The NJDEP New Jersey Environmental Management System (NJEMS) serves as the database that supplies coordinates and descriptive attributes from several tables to generate this GIS layer. This layer is produced primarily for the NJDEP i-MapNJ ArcIMS interactive mapping web application and ArcGIS (ArcView, ArcInfo) users.

The locations in the layer represent main entrance or front door locations for the UST facilities. The majority (approximately 85%) of the UST facilities locations were captured using differential GPS. Users should note that not every site in NJEMS presently (as of July 2006) has an established coordinate (GPS or otherwise). This means that additional UST facilities exist, but are not mapped. NJDEP is continually working to acquire the locations of these with GPS, location data submitted to permitting programs, and through address matching techniques. metadata

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Upper Wetlands Boundary: The Upper Wetlands Boundary/Upper Wetlands Limit data is composed of two wetlands limit lines mapped in two separate NJDEP mapping programs. Those arcs identified as the Upper Wetlands Boundary (UWB) were delineated under the Wetlands Act of 1970 (N.J.S.A. 13:9A-1 et seq). The intent of this act was to regulate development in tidal wetlands of the state. The initial task outlined in the legislation was to identify and map where those tidal wetlands existed in the state. The tidal wetlands delineations were based on the presence of 25 common tidal marsh species, as well as the extent of tidally flowed bare ground. Areas delineated in the original program extend from Trenton on the Delaware River, south around the Cape May Peninsula, and then north to Perth Amboy on the Arthur Kill. UWB delineations under this program were officially promulgated, and the original UWB arcs form a legal regulatory boundary line. While tidally influenced areas do exist north of Perth Amboy, these areas were not mapped in this program due to funding constraints. More information regarding this data can be found in the Abstract section of the full metadata record. metadata

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Urban Enterprise Zones: New Jersey has 32 Urban Enterprise Zones which provide significant incentives and benefits to businesses that locate within the zones. From the northern reaches of the state to its southern tip, there have been dozens upon dozens of success stories made possible through New Jersey's renowned UEZ program. Due to this success, the number of Urban Enterprise Zones has expanded from an original 10 in 1984 to the 32 zones today. Moreover, the program has helped create many full and part-time jobs within the zones. The Urban Enterprise Zone program has become an effective, efficient tool for urban redevelopment. This reputation was only solidified in 1997, when the non-partisan National Association of State Development Agencies (NASDA) called the Garden State's UEZ program the "best in the nation," citing its creation of many thousands of jobs and billions in private investment. metadata

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Urban Wood Waste: Urban wood waste includes wood residues from MSW (wood chips and pallets), utility tree trimming and/or private tree companies, and construction and demolition sites. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Population data; BioCycle Journal: "State of Garbage in America", January 2008; County Business Patterns 2009. metadata

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USGS NWIS Water Monitoring: The U.S. Geological Survey maintains the National Water Information System that includes information on water resources in the United States. This layer contains the NWIS monitoring stations for surface and ground water in New Jersey. The surface water stations are mostly stream and estuary monitoring locations, whereas the ground water monitoring occurs at well locations. A station is a location at which a data collection event takes place, such a collection of a field sample, or measurement of field parameters. metadata

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Utility Line Feature: NOAA's Electronic Navigational Charts (NOAA ENCs) have been developed to support the marine transportation infrastructure and coastal management. The NOAA ENCs are in S-57, a data standard developed by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) to be used for the exchange of digital hydrographic data. NOAA ENC?s can be used in Geographic Information Systems, (GIS) allowing for broader public access. Many GIS's, however cannot read an ENC's native S-57 format to address this problem. NOAA's ENC? Direct to GIS web portal provides comprehensive access to display, query, and download all available large scale NOAA ENC? data in a variety of GIS/CAD formats for non-navigational purposes using Internet mapping service technology. Nautical chart features contained within an NOAA ENC provide a detailed representation of the U.S. coastal and marine environment. This data includes coastal topography, bathymetry, landmarks, geographic place names and marine boundaries. Features in an NOAA ENC are limited in that they only represent the geographic region that is depicted in that particular NOAA ENC. By aggregating nautical features from all NOAA ENCs in the creation of GIS data, a contiguous depiction of the U.S coastal and marine environment is achieved. metadata

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Volunteer Water Monitoring Stations: The Station data is intended to be used by the volunteer monitoring community and the general public to identify the sampling location of the volunteer monitoring programs within New Jersey. The data will allow for public users to determine, at a glance, if data is or is not available on water body of interest. metadata

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Water Bodies: Included are lakes, ponds, bays and major watercourses in the state. These were originally mapped by the United State Geological Survey (USGS) several years ago, as part of the development of the standard USGS topoquads for New Jersey. A companion layer in this application, Streams, also was originally created by the USGS, and shows the smaller rivers, streams and drainage features in the state.metadata

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Water Source Areas: This GIS data-set represents the source water areas for each active public (community and non-community) surface water intake. The surface water source water areas for all wells considered under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDI) are also included. A surface water source water area represents the surface ground area where water will flow overland past the intake location. The source water areas were delineated from the intake location or a controlling structure, such as a dam or weir, to the headwaters of all tributaries upstream of the intake. For more information on the surface water source water areas refer to http://www.nj.gov/dep/swap. metadata

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Watershed Management Areas: The USGS calls the watersheds Hydrologic Units. Each basic unit is a unique feature, and is given a unique Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC), which is 14 digits long. The HUC is hierarchical. Larger and larger watersheds can be defined using different portions of the 14 digit code to define the watershed boundaries. The 21 management areas represent a further aggregation of the basic HUC14 watersheds. In this case, all of the units share the same first 8 digits, again indicating that they are all part of the same major drainage system. Several HUC11 watersheds will be included in each of the Watershed Management Areas. The NJDEP has chosen to use the 21 areas shown in this layer as the basic management unit for watershed characterization and assessment. Since these areas are defined by physical boundaries, they are felt to be more ecologically sound units for environmental planning and management than are the more typically used county or municipal boundaries.metadata

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Watersheds (HUC11): The USGS calls the watersheds Hydrologic Units. Each basic unit is a unique feature, and is given a unique Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC), which is 14 digits long. The HUC is hierarchical. Larger and larger watersheds can be defined using different portions of the 14 digit code to define the watershed boundaries. This layer shows boundaries of larger watershed units, which are created by aggregating together several smaller HUC14 watersheds. All of these smaller watersheds are physically connected to form a larger drainage area. This is reflected in the HUC values of each , all of which share the same first 11 digits. To add some utility to this layer, names of the primary watercourses draining these areas have been added to this layer.metadata

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Well Head Protection Areas (Community): A Well Head Protection Area (WHPA) in New Jersey is a map area calculated around a Public Community Water Supply (PCWS) well in New Jersey that delineates the horizontal extent of ground water captured by a well pumping at a specific rate over a two-, five-, and twelve-year period of time. The area of capture over two-, five-, and twelve-years is defined using line boundaries and polygon areas generated with Geographic Information System (GIS). GIS shape files are produced for each PCWS well and for the set of all PCWS wells in a county. WHPA delineations are conducted in response to the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986 and 1996 as part of the Source Water Protection Program (SWAP). The delineations are the first step in defining the sources of water to a public supply well. Within these areas, potential contamination will be assessed and appropriate monitoring will be undertaken as subsequent phases of the NJDEP SWAP. WHPA delineation methods are described in Guidelines for Delineation of Well Head Protection Areas in New Jersey . metadata

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Well Head Protection Areas (Non-Community): A Well Head Protection Area for a Public Non-Community Water Supply Well (PNCWS) in New Jersey is a map area calculated around a Public Non-Community Water Supply well that delineates the horizontal extent of ground water captured by a well pumping at a specific rate over a two-, five-, and twelve-year period. GIS coverages are produced for each PNCWS well and for the set of all PNCWS wells in each county and for the state. metadata

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Well Program Grid: This grid is based on an old map series called the New Jersey Atlas Sheets, and on a reference system based on them, called the New Jersey Rectangular Coordinate System. The original 17 map sheets, numbered from 21 through 37, were produced with grid lines shown every 2 minutes of latitude and every 2 minutes of longitude, producing a regular grid of Rectangles. This rectangular grid forms the basis of the reference system. For each sheet, groups of Rectangles are aggregated together to form Blocks. Each Block in each sheet is given a number from 1 to 45. Within each BLOCK, each Rectangle is numbered from 1 to 9. Rectangles are further divided into 9 sections called Units, numbered 1 to 9, and each Unit divided into 9 sections called Parts, also numbered 1 to 9. Each of these smallest sub divisions can identified by a unique 7 digit code composed of the Atlas Sheet number, and the number of the Block, Rectangle, Unit and Part. This 7 digit number appears as the label when the Well Program Atlas Grid is displayed. This identifier is part of the historical well database, and is still used on new permits. However, more accurate true State Plane Coordinates are now also required. See the Well Program Help, under the Help Topic Menu, for more information on the grid and the coordinate requirements. metadata

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Well Program Grid 2 X 2 M: The Atlas2x2m is a 2 minute by 2 minute grid dissolved from the Well Program Atlas Sheet Grid for New Jersey.
That grid was based on an old map series called the New Jersey Atlas Sheets and on a reference system based on them called the New Jersey Rectangular Coordinate System. The grid system developed as the ATLAS_GRID does not exist on the atlas sheets but is based on latitude and longitude grids included on the sheets. The original 17 map sheets (numbered from 21 through 37) were produced with grid lines shown every 2 minutes of latitude and every 2 minutes of longitude, producing a regular grid of RECTANGLES. This rectangular grid forms the basis of the reference system. For each sheet, groups of RECTANGLES are aggregated together to form BLOCKS . Each BLOCK in each sheet is given a number from 1 to 45. Within each BLOCK, each RECTANGLE is numbered from 1 to 9. RECTANGLES are further divided into 9 sections called UNITS (numbered 1 to 9) and each UNIT divided into 9 sections called PARTS (also numbered 1 to 9). Each of these smallest sub divisions can be identified by a unique 7 digit code composed of the ATLAS SHEET number, and the number of the BLOCK, RECTANGLE, UNIT and PART. This 7 digit identifier is part of the historical well database and is still used on new permits. metadata

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Wetlands (2012): The wetlands polygons included in this data set are extracted from the Land Use 2012 layer. Displayed are all polygons that have a TYPE12 code of 'WETLANDS'. While these wetland delineations are not regulatory lines, they represent important resource data in identifying potential wetland areas. The 2012 LU/LC data set is the fifth in a series of land use mapping efforts that was begun in 1986. Revisions and additions to the initial baseline layer were done in subsequent years from imagery captured in 1995/97, 2002, 2007 and 2012. This present 2012 update was created by comparing the 2007 LU/LC layer from NJDEP's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to 2012 color infrared (CIR) imagery and delineating and coding areas of change. Work for this data set was done by Aerial Information Systems, Inc., Redlands, CA, under direction of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Bureau of Geographic Information System (BGIS). LU/LC changes were captured by adding new line work and attribute data for the 2012 land use directly to the base data layer. All 2007 LU/LC polygons and attribute fields remain in this data set, so change analysis for the period 2007-2012 can be undertaken from this one layer. The classification system used was a modified Anderson et al., classification system. An impervious surface (IS) code was also assigned to each LU/LC polygon based on the percentage of impervious surface within each polygon as of 2007. Minimum mapping unit (MMU) is 1 acre.ADVISORY:This metadata file contains information for the 2012 Land Use/Land Cover (LU/LC) data sets, which were mapped by USGS Subbasin (HU8). There are additional reference documents listed in this file under Supplemental Information which should also be examined by users of these data sets. metadata

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Wind Energy Zone (Paulsboro): Boundary of NJ Offshore Wind Economic Development Act (OWEDA) Designated Tax Credit Area metadata

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ZIP Codes:ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) are approximate area representations of U.S. Postal Service (USPS) ZIP Code service areas that the Census Bureau creates to present statistical data from Census 2000. The Census Bureau creates ZCTAs for the United States, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands for the 2010 Census. Data users should not use ZCTAs to identify the official USPS ZIP Code for mail delivery. The USPS makes periodic changes to ZIP Codes to support more efficient mail delivery. For the 2010 Census, ZCTAs should more accurately represent the actual ZIP Codes at the time of their delineation than they did for Census 2000. This is because that before the tabulation blocks, which the ZCTAs are built from, were delineated for the 2010 Census, the Census Bureau undertook the process of inserting lines that could be used as 2010 Census tabulation block boundaries, and these lines split polygons where the result would be that a significant number of addresses would occur on either one or both sides of the line associated with a single ZIP Code. metadata

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